How Bloggers Solve Blogging Problems

Attention Hobby Bloggers!

Usually, hobby bloggers solve blogging problems themselves on a daily basis depending on their skill level and on how complex the problems are.

Hobby bloggers, don’t read this if you can solve all your internet and technical issues with your free blogging platform, WordPress.com, Blogger, etc.!

Hobby Bloggers Solve Blogging Problems

The Problem With Spam

(Five years ago)

I wasbeginning to feel jinxed as I struggled technologically to blog. First I had my problems just learning the ropes, then I started jumping unannounced and uninvited into people’s spam boxes. That all came to a head when WordPress.com shut me down for cutting and pasting in a spam comment that had a spammy Gravatar into one of my posts.

Yikes, I sailed to the end of the world and fell off the internet safety web.

Note: (The solution – appeal to WordPress.com. Fortunately, they reinstated my blog.)

Landing In Spam

(a few days later five years ago)

Considering my spam troubles, I was almost afraid to write comments. Tonight I had no comments pending, and four comments sat in MY SPAM file.  Guess what? Three of the four SPAM comments were MINE! hahaha. Good think I checked.

Moral of that story – Check your Spam file from time to time.

Second, when I set my WordPress.com account up I linked it to MY Facebook account so my posts would share to my timeline automatically.  I also manage a Facebook account for San Joaquin Valley Council for the Social Studies, which also had a personal Facebook account.

Note: (Organizations should NOT have personal FB accounts. I deleted the account this year even though it had about 500 followers. Create a page or group for organizations or both.)

Somehow all my posts from my WordPress.com website were published on that account as well. So I pressed x on that Facebook account under the Sharing Setting on my WordPress.com account. I was surprised to discovered that I had 198 followers on Facebook who showed up as statistics on this website. I have no idea how that happened!!!

Note: (WP.com lists the number of FB followers you have if you publish to your personal account or page whether or not those friends visit your site.)

The Cost of Solving Blog Problems on my Free WordPress.com Site

We live in the country where internet service is at a premium.

So I thought you might want to know what happened because of my disaster.  (My website was removed from the internet.)

Vince likes to keep me happy, and blogging makes me happy. Instead of making me wait until Wildblue fills my gigabyte food bowl again, he bought me two gigabytes of service to tide me until the next service month.  We answered emails and comments together for a half hour, and he checked the gigabyte meter.  Without downloading anything, we had used one gigabyte of data.

Hobby Bloggers Solve Blogging ProblemsWe hadn’t pulled up any pictures, visited any outside websites.  So we went to his office, and I quickly published the post I worked on last night from 12:00 – 2:40 a.m using the company’s cheap unlimited data plan.

Gigabytes of data are free out in the country where we live and unlimited from 12:00 a.m. to 5:00 a.m. local time.  Then I answered emails in the evening for about forty-five minutes.  Poof, the other gigabyte disappeared into our internet provider’s ravenous cyber tummy.

At that point, I got messages like, “Your email has not been sent.”

So Vince called Wildblue and insisted that a few emails do not create even megabytes of information, let alone gigabytes.  One gigabyte equals 1,000 megabytes. Even photos can be done in megabytes, and I avoided photos.  I sent my Foothill Magazine friend a link to my post instead of sending photos.  The technical support person agreed with V, and credited our account for the 2 gigabytes, and gave us unlimited gigabytes that should go into effect by TOMORROW NIGHT until they figure out our problem.

Meanwhile, I waited until midnight to start writing my posts for the rest of the week, and It took until about 12:20 for even Wildblue’s normal unlimited gigabytes to kick in.  I couldn’t get on even with the modem directly connected to my computer.  Vince pressed some magic buttons, and after about 20 minutes he was able to pull up my screen.

To Wildblue’s credit, they helped us.  Thank y’all for being so patient and visiting me when I haven’t been able to visit you back for about the last week or more.

Internet service is part of the cost of both professional and hobby blogging. Solving problems ate up my internet data.

You Won’t Like This Problem

In addition to writing every day I try to read a fair number of blogs, and I was in the habit of pressing the “like” button because I couldn’t comment after I WordPress.com banned me from the blogosphere. So, I tried pressing “Like.” Even though my blog had been restored, I couldn’t like anyone’s work.  So If you thought I didn’t like you, you might have been wrong.

Note: (That problem cleared up on its own, and I do not remember why or how.)

Most of the problems I had when I started blogging in 2012 had no overt solutions. Vampires roamed the cyberworld freely creating havoc in the night. Poltergeists ravaged blogs while we slept. Then just as mysteriously elves picked up the pieces and reassembled your blog so they were again usable. c

There was no logic in how a blog fell into disrepair and how it cleared up again.

Conclusion

Are WordPress.com blogs still vulnerable today? I still keep my account active so that I can speak to WordPress.com issues as well as WordPress.org. I have not experienced any problems recently, but I have five years of experience. I’m not pressing my blog to do what it can not do. I have much of my material saved and reworked and republished in this account. I am not so vulnerable.

There is a touch of that mystery that still surrounds the way blogs work. When they get too overwhelming, I have the help of a web developer, Daniel Renteria, who corrects my wrongs and straightens out my website to keep it functioning. I’ll be introducing him to you soon.

There are millions of hobby bloggers using WordPress.com. WordPress.com users published more than 595 million posts and more than 457 million comments in 2016.

What problems do you have blogging? Where do you turn for answers? How can Always Write meet your challenges and be a better blog?

Why You Should Worry When Sex Gratis Visits Your Website

Internet Purgatory Solutions

I’m beginning to feel jinxed as I struggle technologically to blog.  First I had my problems just learning the ropes, then I started jumping unannounced and uninvited into people’s spam boxes.  That all came to a head when WordPress shut me down for pasting in a spam comment with the little gravitar.  NOW I’m voraciously eating up internet gigabytes like there’s no tomorrow, and maybe I’ve sailed to the end of the world, and fallen off the internet safety web.

reasontostand.org

So I thought you might want to know what happened today.  V likes to keep me happy, so instead of making me wait until Nov. 24 when Wildblue fills my gigabyte food bowl again, he bought me 2 gigabytes of service.  We answered emails and comments together for a half hour, and he checked the gigabyte meter.  Amazingly we had used 1 gigabyte.  We hadn’t downloaded anything.  We hadn’t pulled up any pictures, visited any of your websites, nothing.  So we went to his office, and I quickly published the post I worked on last night from 12:00 – 2:40 a.m.  Gigabytes are free and unlimited from 12:00 a.m. to 5:00 a.m. local time.  Then I answered emails in the evening for about 45 minutes.  Poof, the other gigabyte disappeared into my ravenous cybertummy.  At that point I got messages like, “Your email has not been sent.”

So V called Wildblue, and insisted that a few emails do not create even megabytes of information, let alone gigabytes.  Even photos can be done in megabytes, and I avoided photos.  I sent my Foothill Magazine friend a link to my post instead of sending photos.  The technical support person agreed with V, and credited our account for the 2 gigabytes, and gave us unlimited gigabytes that should go into effect by TOMORROW NIGHT until they figure out our problem.

Meanwhile, I waited until midnight to start writing my posts for the rest of the week, and It took until about 12:20 for even Wildblue’s normal unlimited gigabytes to kick in.  I couldn’t get on even with the modem directly connected to my computer.  V pressed some magic buttons, and after about 20 minutes he was able to pull up my screen.

To Wildblue’s credit, they are trying to help us.  Thank y’all for being so patient and visiting me when I haven’t been able to visit you back for about the last week or more.

Trackbacks, Pings

… [Trackback]…

[…] There you will find 77615 more Infos: tchistorygal.wordpress.com/2012/10/08/spam-and-stats/ […]…

Tara Hunt heartshapedblog.com
“A trackback is an acknowledgment. This acknowledgment is sent via a network signal (ping) from the originating site to the receiving site. The receptor often publishes a link back to the originator indicating its worthiness. Trackback requires both sites to be trackback-enabled in order to establish this communication.Trackbacks are used primarily to facilitate communication between blogs; if a blogger writes a new entry commenting on, or referring to, an entry found at another blog, and both blogging tools support the TrackBack protocol, then the commenting blogger can notify the other blog with a “TrackBack ping“; the receiving blog will typically display summaries of, and links to, all the commenting entries below the original entry. This allows for conversations spanning several blogs that readers can easily follow.” Wikipedia
This information helps me somewhat, but there are 40+ of these trackbacks in my spam files, so am I to assume that all trackbacks are SPAM?  Even my own trackbacks, which come up automatically when I do a series of articles such as my Hawaii trip and embed a link to my other articles, are in my spam files.  WordPress has a series of articles that I’m sure I’ve read, and you may have also, but for me it takes some rereading to successfully negotiate the mechanics of blogging.

“Comment Spam

Comment Spam refers to useless comments (or trackbacks, or pingbacks) to posts on a blog. These are often irrelevant to the context value of the post. They can contain one or more links to other websites or domains. Spammers use Comment Spam as a medium to get higher page rank for their domains in Google, so that they can sell those domains at a higher price sometime in future or to obtain a high ranking in search results for an existing website.”

That answers the question, “Why do spammers spam?

“Spammers are relentless; because there can be substantial money involved, they work hard at their “job.” They even build automated tools (robots) to rapidly submit their spam to the same or multiple weblogs. Many webloggers, especially beginners, sometimes feel overwhelmed by Comment Spam.

There are solutions, though, to avoiding Comment Spam. WordPress includes many tools for combating Comment Spam. With a little up front effort, Comment Spam can be manageable, and certainly no reason to give up weblogging.”

I came across another article that advises for and tells how to disable trackbacks and pings.

Given my history with spam, would you all y’all advise me to press “Delete Permanently” or “Not Spam”?

 

Questions I Have About Doing WP

 

I spend an inordinate amount of time trying to problem solve using the tools that companies – open source or otherwise – give their customers to take care of their products.  My problems never fit within the normal range – ask Steve Woods,a tech expert at TCOE, who cringes to see me coming.  (I’m taking his Photoshop class tonight – get ready Steve.)

So I am still trying to check out why I’m being so spammy, because I responded to several sites from my reader, and my comments after the posting sign finished, the comment disappeared. I have posted on that site many times!!!  I went to a WordPress forum.  I get distracted on that website when I notice that lots of people have listed their websites for the WP folks to go visit.  Then they type a problem they are having in the subject line.  I think I’ll do that.  But first you have to answer questions and fill in forms.  One of the first questions you have to answer is, “What version of WordPress are you using?”  How would I know that?  I have looked on every page in my menu, and there is nothing about versions.  So I resigned that for now.

Next, I saw that there are WordPress camps around the world where you can go learn about WordPress.  That was cool.  The ones on the west coast were in August ad September.  I think I’ll wait for the Paris trip.

http://www.techwench.com/top-5-tactics-to-increase-your-website-traffic/

Accidentally I saw a way to get your site maximized on google searches.  You had to verify your site by placing the google meta code on your home page.  So I opened up my pages in the dashboard, and the home page didn’t show in the menu.  Then I went to the menu, and clicked home, and it still didn’t show.  The google instructions were pretty clear as to where to paste the meta thingy, but I couldn’t find my home page in order to paste anything.  Of course, I could go to the home page as an outsider, but that didn’t help me paste the meta code.  The dashboard seems to be synonymous with home page, but I couldn’t find the areas that looked like what was so clearly listed by the Google experts.

The result is that I am totally frustrated which I don’t blame on WP.  I had a similar problem already this morning trying to do online bill paying with B of A.  After explaining it to three customer service representatives, and being disconnected twice, and disconnecting myself after the chatter person didn’t chatter for a long time, I disconnected myself.  So I’m starting my own help page.  I ask the questions.  Someone knowledgable sees them, and writes me a decodable answer.

 

The Un-Spam Button

 

I am researching why my comments appearing in some of your spam folders.  I went on wordpress.org and got a user name and password to begin my search.  As I was reading another user’s words of woe, I read that Akismet also has a support site.  It was more helpful.  This is part of what Akismet support said.

“A comment from a friend appeared in my spam folder. Why, and what should I do?

Use the un-spam button in WordPress to rescue it, or the equivalent button in your blog or forum application.

Akismet isn’t perfect, and occasional errors do happen. The un-spam button will teach Akismet not to make the same mistake again.

I heard that Akismet blocks IP addresses and websites. Is that true?

No, Akismet is not a web site or IP blacklist. Blacklisting isn’t very effective and causes false positives, so we don’t do it.

Instead, Akismet always uses all the available information about a comment together in order to determine if it’s real or spam. The IP address is an important piece of information, but it’s always used in conjunction with other information about each comment.

Additionally, Akismet learns the preferences of each individual blog owner, and tailors its results accordingly – each blog has different standards for what is and is not considered spam, so Akismet produces different results on each blog.

All of the comments on my blog are going to spam!

Are you using the ReCaptcha plugin for WordPress? If so, please disable it and see if that fixes the problem. It sometimes catches comments as spam even when Akismet says they’re not.

If that doesn’t fix the problem, please contact support and we’ll investigate.”

On my site I have found that Akismet has done a good job.  Once in a while I will find a comment that makes sense – even though I don’t know the blogger – I let them in.  Most of the time Akismet keeps out sites that are only selling things, are only about sex, or have really ridiculous grammar and syntax.

There were many more entries, but the gist of the matter is that if my comments are going to your spam folder, then you are going to have to invite me back in. – unspam me.  If I have said something offensive to you, I am deeply sorry. However, since the reporters of my spammy comments have been new blogging friends, I imagine that only your computer or your spam catching program is offended by my remarks or IP address. To those offended technologies I say, “Unspam yourself, and have a great day!”

🙂