#WQWWC #9: Trustworthiness @ColleenChesebro, @ReflectionsWalk

Welcome back to Writer’s Quotes Wednesdays Writing Challenge.

It’s simple to join in! Find quotes (as many or as few as you want), your choice of response. If you want to participate, write a post, create a pingback to link your post. Not sure how to do that? See how to create pingbacks here

Flex your creative muscles and share what you think about the topic of the week using a quote from a favorite author.

The Topic This Week

This week’s topic for #WQWWC is trustworthiness, trustworthy or trust.  

Trust seems to be in high demand and low supply in some arenas of life today. But how valuable is trustworthiness?

“The glue that holds all relationships together … is trust, and trust is based on integrity.”

Brian Tracy

Integrity means the quality or practice of being honest. 

In my mother’s preschool class a little boy took another toddler’s sunglasses and paraded around the room with them on. When Mom caught him, he cried and blamed a little girl across the room as he maintained tight possession of the sunglasses. 

Blame creates distrust.

“Our distrust is very expensive.”

Ralph Waldo Emerson

How to Build a Community with Trust

“A society that relies on generalized reciprocity is more efficient than a distrustful society, for the same reason that money is more efficient than barter. Trust lubricates social life. Networks of civic engagement also facilitate coordination and communication and amplify information about the trustworthiness of other individuals.”

Robert D. Putnam

Tulare County Office of Education(TCOE) teaches character and recognizes in children across the county for qualities like trustworthiness. Our leaders supported teachers with the program Character Counts so that students would learn the Six Pillars of Character that will make them good citizens and leaders when they grow up.

Until our department at TCOE studied The Speed of Trust by Stephen Covey, I had never associated trust with economics and speed. It made sense though when I considered how easy it is to get something done when there is trust in the relationship.

One of the reasons that moving from Woodlake was so hard for me was the economics of trust that I enjoyed because I was part of a trustworthy organization. Getting things done for Kiwanis was simple. Sometimes we signed paperwork. Sometimes the city did the paperwork for us. Sometimes we paid a fee, but most of the time it was waived. 

Kiwanis had built up trust with the city and it followed all of the members because of the years of honesty and follow through initiated by a few individuals. 

Groups that did not have that degree of trust developed, got little done and had a hard time attracting members.  

When I took an active role in Kiwanis, I felt my personal competence in trustworthiness grow. Kiwanians were known to always go the extra mile, therefore my personal level of trust with others in that community grew exponentially when I did business in their name. 

How to Grow Self-Trust

“Whoever is careless with the truth in small matters cannot be trusted in important affairs.”

Albert Einstein

My parents tried to build trustworthiness in my brother and me by assigning chores. One of my chores at age seven was emptying and burning the trash in the large oil drum in the backyard. (Showing my age here!) At least I thought burning was part of my responsibility. The trash barrel was humongous and I wasn’t, so I remember it being a difficult chore, but I loved the burning part. I remember my parents taking that chore off my list when the fire got out of hand one night. 

The trash was not the only thing that burned that night. My self-trustworthiness went down a notch as well. What I learned was that if I botched the job, I probably would not have to do that one again or possibly would face some kind of punishment for not completing the assignment successfully. 

During my school years I developed the habit of excusing myself. Forgot my homework, Mom will bring it. Don’t want to speak in front of the class – play sick. Don’t want to do an assignment – wait till the last minute. It’s no wonder that I had very little self-esteem. I wasn’t building self-trust.

One way to build self-trust and reputation for trustworthiness is through participation in church, family, job, community service organizations, sports, local theatre, or musical groups. Being part of a group holds us responsible and develops character. But developing self-trust goes deeper than keeping good company.

“The process of building trust is an interesting one, but it begins with yourself, with what I call self trust, and with your own credibility, your own trustworthiness. If you think about it, it’s hard to establish trust with others if you can’t trust yourself.

Stephen Covey

Trustworthiness is important at every level, as Stephen Covey points out. My husband and I vowed to walk 35,000 steps a week when we moved to Prescott. No one is checking up on us. This week we are not doing it because of the snow. It is going to be hard to make it up, it’s much easier to let it slide. If we want to increase our self-trust we will find a way to get those steps in or make it up later. If we do it, we will feel good about ourselves. And we will get in shape – a side benefit. 

Being trustworthy is hard work for me. I have a post that I have to get out for Wednesday, January 27th. You are going to hold me accountable because the name of the challenge has the weekday built in it. 

So what is trustworthiness to you? 

Here are some other quotes I found that I wanted to share. There are hundreds of others that may inspire you. 

“When we feel unsafe with someone and still stay with him (or her), we damage our ability to discern trustworthiness in those we will meet in the future.”

David Richo

“Women in my focus groups, they say a bald man is trustworthy. He has nothing to hide. “

Kellyanne Conway

“Your faithfulness makes you trustworthy to God.”

Edwin Louis Cole

“People crave trustworthy information about the world we live in. Some people want it because it is essential to the way they make a living. Some want it because they regard being well-informed as a condition of good citizenship. Some want it because they want something to exchange over dinner tables and water coolers.”

Bill Keller

I look forward to reading what you have to say on the subject. Talk to me! 

Check This Out

Changes by Frank

In the Garden: Labor of Love

Thank you to all who have labored over the years. We stand on your shoulders and labor to help the next generations have a better world.

#Lens-Artist Challenge #113

#Sunday Stills: Orange

Woodlake Rose Garden began in 2004 as a labor of love, a gift from Manuel Jimenez, a local resident and Professor Emeritus at UC Davis, small farm advisor for the Southern Valley.

Manuel credits the garden to his wife, Olga for her love of roses. I picked a particularly lovely rose from the garden for Hugh and his Sunday Stills challenge of “orange.” This post is not colored orange, but see how many orange items you can spot.

As it grew, Woodlake Pride, a local nonprofit organization maintained the garden with the help of volunteers, mostly students.

When Manuel stepped back to focus on the Botanical Garden, three years ago, the rose garden fell into a state of disrepair. Kiwanis of Woodlake stepped in to fill in the gap between what the City of Woodlake could manage, and what needed to be done to bring the gardens back.

As a Kiwanian, I think that the pride in helping our small town stay beautiful is the primary benefit of this labor of love. We also benefit from meeting the many people who come to the gardens to enjoy a gentle walk. I also enjoy giving back in a small way to Manuel and Olga Jimenez.

Kiwanis enlisted some other non-profits to help out. Until COVID 19, the Master Gardeners of Tulare County maintained the largest portion of the garden. UC Davis restricted them from working in any garden anywhere because of the pandemic so they have just begun to work in the garden again. The weeds and work multiplied tenfold while they were gone. We are super glad they are back.

There’s at lease one orange item here.

Above and Beyond

One Kiwanian stands out above and beyond the rest. Sally Pace spearheads the labor of love for the Kiwanis Club of Woodlake. A weekly walk determines the focus of the work. During midweek visits she provides the approved chemicals and sprays the weeds so that no one will get blasted with unwanted herbicide except her.

You’ll have to work hard to see the orange in this picture.

During official workdays, she digs out stubborn weeds choking the roses, deadheads, and makes her husband deliver mulch from their property to spread around the roses. She coordinates sprinkler repairs, donating little parts from her surplus stash at home, purchasing the bigger ones needed to repair the endless water leaks and recruiting volunteers to help her.

The trash that people throw in the garden, turn me orange with anger.

Need student help? No worries, Sally visits the Ag teachers at Woodlake High School to enlist their help identifying great students who need to earn community service hours in order to graduate. Early on the designated Saturday mornings Sally meets them and any Kiwanians who happen to come to help at the garden with snacks and a truck-load of equipment.

Watch out, Dennis. Hold on to your orange hat.

Supervising the students? Not really. She designates them to other Kiwanians. They just hope and pray they don’t get assigned to the man with the chainsaw. No one can keep up with her as she tackles whatever seems the most urgent problem of the day. You have to catch her to photograph her.

Then she sends out an email telling how hard everyone else worked and how fabulous they all are. I’m not sure how she benefits from her labor of love, but she labors tirelessly.

Heroes with No Vested Interest

Another set of unsung heroes are the folks like the ones in this picture who came from nearby Visalia to walk around the lake and saw us working. They have no vested interest other than they love the gardens. The next time they came to walk they brought pruners, and started deadheading roses. Another couple has come from Three Rivers several times to weed and patch vital water lines.

A local police officer dropped by when I was working with two students weeding, and stepped in to lend a hand. Local residents see a Facebook post and bring their rakes and their friends and come to the garden. Denise gets more done in an hour than most people do in ten.

Even the park bench sitters pick up a shovel, rake and hoe when we come near their benches rather than to sit and watch us work.

Here’s to happy Labor Day festivities to you, however you choose to spend them. If you come to Woodlake, might we suggest some labor of love ideas?

Bit Moji wink

Thanks for hosting the Lens-Artists Challenge #113, Rusha.

Thanks to Hugh Roberts for hosting #Sunday Stills – Orange.

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If you host a challenge, writing or photography, please contact me. I would love to interview you and share the “behind the scenes” story about your challenge.

Weekly Photo Challenge: Companionable

I love companionable.  People and animals getting along together.  Maybe even plants, anything that breathes.  Things???  Well, Manny is companionable, but usually…  Well there are a few things I can’t do without, too, come to think of it.

SFW Companionable 120

Puppy Girl and Mama Kitty are about the same size and very companionable.  Even from the start Mama accepted PG.  Who knows why?  She hates other cats that come around.

BJ and Piggles

I used to raise guinea pigs.  my puppy BJ was so jealous of what we gave the guinea pigs that he would eat things that dogs just hate – like lettuce.  He and Bud were very companionable with the guinea pigs when we fed them.  Piggles didn’t mind being companionable.

History Girls

My good friends, the history girls, and I decided that one of our outings would be to see Wicked.  I found these perfect sparkly red shoes at the Sears store in the shopping mall near the theatre – wonder why?  They were only $9.99.  Who could pass on that?  We wore them and felt companionable, not just with each other, but with the play as well.

SFW  Companionable117

Now I have to go BE companionable with the Woodlake Kiwanians who put on a July  3rd Fireworks Display.  I hate working in 108 degree heat, but I am going to be companionable – until I melt.  🙂  Lots of love to everyone.  Remember to be companionable tomorrow as you celebrate our freedom to be companionable.

Photoshopped Foothill Peach Tree Orchard

 Years ago I took a series of fruit tree pictures but I hated the sky.  So I tried a trick from Leanne.  I tried to make major changes to it.  Please tell me whether you think my work is believable, and if it does the trick, or whether I should stick to the original.

Original peach grove

Sometimes the skies, even in the spring just look dirty.  Sometimes they are stunning.  So I borrowed a stunning sky from the following picture, and I copied it into the picture you see above.

Beautiful spring sky in the foothills

The next thing I had to do was fill in the area between the part of sky that I pasted in and the tops of the trees.  That was hard work.  I started with the cloning tool, and got all kinds of extra tree tops, ugly dirty sky, layers of clouds, and odd colors in odd places.  So I used the brush tool and picked up a light color from the sky and erased the weird layers of clouds.

Peach trees with altered sky.

I am not super pleased with the left side of the sky, but I’m not sure how to make it look any better.  So what do you think?