How Do You Compare Dropbox V Google Drive?

Two Great Applications: Compare Dropbox V Google Drive

Compare Dropbox V Google Drive
Compare Dropbox V Google Drive

When I compare Dropbox V Google Drive, my opinions have changed over the years because Google Drive has expanded its products. Both technologies have enormous value.

Not all technology eliminates frustration and irritation from my life, but for the most part, these two applications do. For the past six years, I used Google Docs almost daily. Five years ago, I could have been a Dropbox salesperson. I kept my day job because both of these products are free.

Without Storage Drives

Five years ago when I worked as an educational consultant, I often worked on large projects with several collaborators across the state of California. Projects usually needed lots of edits. Before I learned about Dropbox, I emailed myself work to do at home. I would write or edit, then email it back to work, where my secretary/editor would continue to correct.  We had so many copies on our computers that we got lost in the stacks of virtual files. We created new names, and new files to keep them all straight.

Cloud-Based Storage Improves Collaboration

Compare Dropbox V Google Drive
Even simple games take some time to develop.

Dropbox and Google both store documents on the web and have different benefits. Five years ago I preferred Dropbox for most uses because of the following reasons.

1)  Dropbox uses whatever software you are using. I use Microsoft products, and Dropbox stores all my documents as Word Docx or other Office documents. Most people say they receive and can open up a document that I send them from Dropbox.

2)  Google Drive has its own products like Microsoft. After six years of constant use, I prefer these now. Some people say they cannot open them when I email the link. There is a learning curve to opening and using a Google Doc. For example, if someone sends you a Google Doc, you have to edit THAT doc from the link he or she sent you. If you save it and edit in your Drive, it will not save to the shared doc.

3)  Dropbox remains available offline making it convenient for the user. Google Drive works better online.

4)  Notifications Everyone with whom I have shared a Dropbox folder gets a message every time I make a change on a document. People say, “I got lots of notifications that you modified the documents.  You must work hard.” Did you hear that boss? I’m never satisfied with what I write, but they might also be seeing all my secretary’s  or one of my collaborator’s hard work instead.  I just smile, the project is active! Google Drive sends an email.

Compare Dropbox V Google Drive
” Nine files have been synced.”

5)  Click a tab to view Dropbox revisions. Google revisions show in the file menu “See Revision History”

However, in spite of my love for Dropbox, there are some things that Google does better.

Compare Dropbox V Google Drive

1) If you collaborate in real-time, you can see the Google Dive edits instantly, and chat as you write. It’s confusing but doable.  With Dropbox, the changes do not appear until you save and sync your document. Even then, your collaborator still sees the old material, until they close their offline version, and reopen it. Losing immediacy is not convenient when you are working in real-time together, even when you are all in the same room.

2) I had an another experience in which several of us were taking notes on the agenda created in a shared Dropbox folder.  My notes wrote over someone else’s notes, and his digital scribbles were gone, and all Dropbox had to say about it was “Marsha’s corrupted copy”  Both of us were red in the face that time.  Mine was embarrassed.

Storage Space Compare Dropbox V Google Drive

3) Both applications have a lot of free storage space. Google has more. Because my photos have loaded automatically on Dropbox, I have maxed out my storage space. To earn more storage, get your friends to use Dropbox. If you want to open up another Dropbox account with a different email account, you get more space, without having the convenience of offline accessibility.  In six years or so I have never run out of space with Google Drive.

If you want extra storage, compare Dropbox V Google Drive. Here are the current prices.

Google Drive

15GB- Free

100GB- $1.99 per month

1TB- $9.99 per month

Dropbox

2GB- Free

Up to 16GB- Free, if you refer friends. With a basic free account, you get an extra 500MB per referral, and you can earn up to 16GB total through this method. Paid users get 1GB instead of 500MB per referral.

1TB- $9.99 per month

How Lucky Are We to Compare Dropbox V Google Drive?

When I was a middle school student, my mother brought me the homework I forgot to take to school. Moms of the”iGeneration” will never understand that chore. Teachers can get access to homework instantly. Even the dog can’t eat it. Thank you technological cyber-geniuses. That’s one less problem for moms in the twenty-first-century world.

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Which is your favorite cloud storage, or do you use something else?

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Google Drive v Dropbox and Other Cloud Storage Solutions

So am I a technical guru like ShareChair?  Is that part of my branding?

Cloud Storage Solutions

My first technical post (#2 EVER) got no likes.  (That’s good English!)  I was so desperate for comments, In order to practice chatting, I kept the best of the spam, and responded to it.  I rejoiced when I bandied three times with a spammer!

In this upgraded post I’m going to condense the information, and republish because it was useful to me when I learned about these products.  I hope you enjoy it.  If not, just press like!  hahaha  Or you can go to my FB fan page and check out the good-looking cowboys riding around Bravo Lake and LIKE them at TC History Gal Productions!

Start reading

Not all technology eliminates frustration and irritation from my life (understatement of the century), but for the most part these two applications do.  Although I use Google Docs almost daily, I should be a Dropbox salesperson.  $0. X 100% commission =???

I could be a Dropbox salesperson.

Dropbox and Google both store documents on the web and have different benefits, but personally I prefer Dropbox for most uses because of the following reasons.

1)  Google has good products, but they do not have all the flexibility of either Microsoft Word or Apple Pages.  Dropbox uses whatever software you are using.

2)  I have had people complain that they couldn’t open a Google Doc.  Most people say they receive and can open up a document that I send them from Dropbox.

3)  You have to log in to use Google Docs, and that can take more time that I want to spend.  I’m not in the TWITCH generation, but I have become  accustomed to instant.  Dropbox gives me instant use offline.

4)  With Google I seem to end up with revisions in my “Google Drive” with the same name as the original documents.  It doesn’t take much to confuse me.

5)  Another problem I have with Google and other cloud-only applications I blame on my internet provider.  Rural America, where I live, is internet-challenged.  When you reach the service limit, the provider puts the brakes on the internet speed.  Slow speed means that Google Docs can’t keep up with 25 WPM plus error erasing typing speed, resulting in letters and even words left out of an original document.  The solution is to upload a document created offline when your internet quota is recharged.

6)   Individual Google Docs can exceed its megabyte limit if the document has several pictures.  Dropbox has a limit if you haven’t earned extra storage units or upgraded, but unless you reach that limit, individual documents save with no problem.

In spite of my love for Dropbox, there are some things that Google does better.

1)  Dropbox changes are not visible until you save and sync your document.  Your collaborator sees the old document, until they close, and reopen it ONLINE.  Google changes are instantaneous. You can have several people online all doing the editing and chatting at the same time.

2)  I had an another experience in which several of us were taking notes on an agenda created in a joint Dropbox folder.  My notes wrote over someone else’s notes, and his were gone, and all Dropbox had to say about it was “Marsha’s corrupted copy”  Both of us had a red face.  Mine was embarrassed, hers was not!

3)  I have nearly run out of space with Dropbox.  The free version is limited to 5 GB.  If you get your friends to use Dropbox you earn more space.  You can open another Dropbox account using a different email account, but you don’t have the same convenience as you do with your primary account that is downloaded to all your computers.  I have never run out of space with Google Docs.

Since I wrote this article I discovered that there are other cloud solutions like Dropbox.  All the ones I’ve checked out have a 5 gigabyte storage limit unless you upgrade.  This article compares the top 10 companies.

I hope this old article was helpful.  🙂  If not, I’ll change my brand tomorrow!  🙂

Dropbox v Google Docs

Not all technology eliminates frustration and irritation from my life, but for the most part these two applications do.  Although I use Google Docs almost daily, I should be a Dropbox salesperson.  For now, I’ll keep my day job, because I’m afraid that I couldn’t live for very long on my commission checks since both of these products are free.

I could be a Dropbox salesperson.

I often work on large projects with several collaborators, and the way I write, the projects usually need lots of edits.  Before Dropbox I used to email myself work to do at home.  I was thrilled that I could do that!  I would write or edit, then email it back to work, where my secretary/editor would edit.  We had so many copies in our computers that we got lost in the stacks of virtual files.  We created new names, and new files to keep them all straight.  One time the server at the office went down, and when it came back up again there was a new P Drive.  What no one knew was that for some reason I was still accessing the old P Drive, and my secretary was editing on the new P Drive.  Oddly we didn’t catch on to that fact for days.  Hopefully this doesn’t even sound vaguely familiar to you because I guarantee it was frustrating.

Even simple games take time to develop.

Dropbox and Google both store documents on the web and have different benefits, but personally I prefer Dropbox for most uses because of the following reasons.

1)  Dropbox uses whatever software you are using.  I use Microsoft products, and Dropbox stores all my documents as Word docx.  Google has good products, but they do not have all of the flexibility that I have spent years learning in Microsoft.

2)  Most people say they receive and can open up a document that I send them from Dropbox.  I have had people complain that they couldn’t open a Google Doc.  That may not be the problem with Google Doc, but with me the techy-less wonder, or even possibly the techy-less friend to whom I am sending a link.

3)  I can open up Dropbox without even being on the Internet, do my work, and as soon as I turn on the internet, the work syncs to the cyber cloud.  You have to log in to use Google Docs, and on my pokey computer, that can take more time that I want to spend.  I’m not in the twitch generation, but I have become  accustomed to instant.

4)  This makes me happy.  Everyone with whom I have shared a Dropbox folder gets a little message every time I make a change on a document.  People say, “I got lots of notifications that documents have been changed.  You must work REALLY hard.”  Did you hear that boss?   Actually I’m never satisfied with what I write, but they might also be seeing all my secretary’s  or one of my collaborator’s hard work instead.  I just smile, the project is active!

" 9 files have been synced."

5)  Using Dropbox you don’t create multiple versions of documents that get in your way all the time.  All of the revisions are saved, but you have to click on a tab to locate them, so they are not in your face all the time.  With Google I seem to end up with revisions with the same name as the original documents.  It doesn’t take much to confuse me.

6)  Another problem I have with Google and other cloud-only applications I blame on my internet provider.  Rural America where I live is internet-challenged, and the monopoly service I use puts the brakes on the internet speed when I have loaded too many megabytes of information during a 24 hour period.   When I am using Google Docs and that happens, I  type a few words, and wait for Google to catch up with me.  Sometimes Google completely has left out part of what I typed.  That was so irritating that I quit composing in Google, and did my work offline, and then uploaded it to Google later.   I have not had that happen since I learned to manage my download bytes, but trust comes back slowly so I still do most of my writing on Dropbox offline for that reason.

7)  Finally, there doesn’t seem to be a size limit on the document that can be uploaded to Dropbox, but I have exceeded my megabyte limit on Google when uploading a document containing several pictures.

However, in spite of my love for Dropbox, there are some things that Google does better.

1) For example, if you are collaborating in real-time, you can see the edits instantly, and you can chat as you write.  So it’s like you are thinking out loud as you write.  You can have several people online all doing the editing and chatting at the same time.  Confusing, but doable.  With Dropbox the changes are not visible until you save and sync your document.  Even then, your collaborator is still seeing the old document, until they close, and reopen it.  This is not convenient when you are working in real-time together, even when you are all in the same room.

2)  I had an another experience in which several of us were taking notes on an agenda created in a joint Dropbox folder.  My notes wrote over someone else’s notes, and his were gone, and all Dropbox had to say about it was “Marsha’s corrupted copy”  Both of us were red in the face that time.  Mine was embarrassed.

3)  I have nearly run out of space with Dropbox.  If you get your friends to use Dropbox you earn more space.  I like that.  If you want to open up another Dropbox account with a different email account, you get more space, but you don’t have the same convenience as you do with your primary account that is downloaded to all your computers.  You have to go online to Dropbox.com and log in with a different email account, and that is a hassle.  I think it is better to have all your files in one account and bite the bullet to buy more space than to have all your files spread over different accounts.  Saving space by using multiple accounts is bad when you forget in which account you stored the minutes to the meeting,  and the meeting just started, and it’s time to read the minutes.   I have never run out of space with Google Docs.

When I was a middle school student, my mother learned to drive just so she could bring me the homework I forgot to take to school.  At least that’s what I thought at the time.   Moms of the”igeneration” will never understand that chore.  Homework is accessible from everywhere and even the dog can’t eat it.  Thank you technological cyber-geniuses.  That’s one less problem for moms in the 2012 world.