Visit Las Vegas While It's Cool!

Vacation in Las Vegas at Polo Towers February 23-March 1, 2020

3745 Las Vegas Boulevard South, Las Vegas, NV 89109 USA

Vince said, “Cut the price in half!”

One-bedroom suite $1,022  for a week! So here you go! $511 for one WEEK in Vegas!

Polo Towers Resort Las Vegas
Polo Tower Suites right on the Las Vegas Strip

We have the perfect opportunity for you to relax and enjoy the Las Vegas Strip, or get out and enjoy the excitement – either works!

Las Vegas Strip outside of Polo Towers.

This beautiful 602 square foot one-bedroom suite with a full kitchen is located on the Las Vegas Strip within walking distance from all the huge casinos. It conveniently comes with a free parking pass. 

Situated between the Miracle Mile of Shops and a strip mall which includes Ross, ABC, CVS makes your stay very comfortable and economical. The resort boasts two pools, a BBQ area, business center services, fitness center, laundry facilities, free WiFi, and local phone calls.

Las Vegas Rental Polo Towers

The view out of our Polo Towers suite on the Las Vegas Strip across from the Aria.

Showing that week are the Cirque du Soleil O, Michael Jackson One by Cirque du Soleil, Zoomanity, Penn and Teller, Blue Man Group and David Copperfield, and Chris Angel.

If you want to sightsee try Hoover Dam – 1 hour, Valley of Fire – 1 hour, Grand Canyon 4.5 hours, or Zion National Park 2.5 hours, Bryce Canyon National Park – 4 hours, and the other three National Parks within 7 hours of Las Vegas.

Polo Towers

Las Vegas Polo Tower Suites February 21-March 1, 2020

This beautiful 602 square foot one-bedroom suite with a full kitchen is located on the Las Vegas Strip within walking distance from all the huge casinos. It conveniently comes with a free parking pass.

$511.00

Reviewing Books – The Picture of Dorian Gray

Thanks to ShareChair I ordered several classic books along with their audio books for free from Amazon.  You really do need to check out her blog.  It’s all technology, and incredibly organized, every article practical or thought-provoking.

taken from an excellent review of the book – http://salmanlatif.wordpress.com/2011/08/04/the-picture-of-dorian-gray/

Back to books, I just finished my third book from this classic find, and I thought that the least I could do would be to offer a review, something new and fresh.  My review for David Copperfield evolved naturally, and I didn’t search the internet first.  However, before I started writing my next remarkable review I decided to search the internet to find out what others said about  The Picture of Dorian Gray by Oscar Wilde.

I started with Wikipedia, which offered a complete background of the controversy that surrounded the book, the author,  and the characters.  The next site suggested by Google was Sparks Notes.   This was even more complete, but not as easy to stay awake while reading.  It included famous quotes, as well as someone’s explanations to those quotes, study questions and answers.  By this time I was getting so sleepy that I nodded off in the middle of reading, and the page disappeared.  I was ready to finish my search for other reviews – especially since I am not actually having to write a paper or participate in a class discussion.  But I am persistent, I plodded on and looked at the third review source, Goodreads.

I’ve seen the Goodreads sign in the side banner of some websites, but haven’t seen the benefit of them yet.  From the Goodreads reviewers of Dorian Gray I learned that many of them enjoyed Oscar Wilde’s humor in this book.  I am not the fastest reader, but I may be the most distracted one.  This book took me less than a week to finish, as I was reading 2-3 others, but as I read the reviews, I realized that I hadn’t caught some of the nuances that other readers had noticed.

The major nuance should have been as obvious as an uprooted tree lying across the road resulting from Hurricane Sandy’s wrath.  I somehow missed Wilde’s humor entirely in this story about a hedonistic, homoerotic, narcissistic young man, Dorian, and his older guide, Harry, who actually lived the cleaner life.  Actually I missed most of the nuances.  I didn’t notice the fact that he had opium at home, but had to go to the opium dens after he killed his friend, the artist, and had his chemist friend destroyed the body which indicated the depths to which his depravity hit.  I failed to see the symbolic colors used in the novel.

Not only did I overlook the language arts nuances, I failed to note many redeeming historical analysis skills that could be gained from reading this book.  Because psychology is one of the social sciences, a pitch could be made to read this book as a study in psychological disorders.

At the same time I was reading Dorian, I finished the In Search of Bill Clinton:  A Psychological Biography, by John Gartner, the story of another charmingly engaging fellow.  I couldn’t help but compare the two personalities, since both have narcissistic traits.  Clinton managed his, and poor Dorian did not have his skills or moral balance to do the same.  The fictitious character, Dorian Gray, had a true malignant disorder, whereas Clinton was diagnosed as having hypomanic traits which were not malignant.

In spite of all the literary connections which I didn’t recognize, I enjoyed reading the book, and I would recommend it to those who love classics, and a touch of what I would classify as very early science fiction.

I would not recommend it as a literary classic that meets Common Core Standards, AND the standards for History-Social Studies.  Since English teachers only get 50% literature, and need to focus the other 50% of their time on expository reading, I would not waste the student’s precious literature hours on this book.  They can read it when they are on their own as part of a life-long learning program.

I am trying to develop a schedule to my posting, so I write the day before, then polish in the morning before I post.  As I was looking for a good picture this morning, I came across this excellent review o a WordPress site where I got the picture I used.  Click here to read that review.  ShareChair must have inspired many people to read this book because I found several other reviews that have been done in the last month or so, which I included below.  Who knew Dorian would be making such a great come back?

David Copperfield and the Common Core

A new blogging friend, Sharechair, blogged about a great Amazon offer of free audible books.  I rushed to Amazon and downloaded about ten of them.  The first one I listened to was David Copperfield by Charles Dickens, narrated by Simon Vance.

Vance transports you to 1850s England in a time before cell phones, cars, planes, or any kind of easy communication that we have today.  The wonderful fiction becomes a window to the world in that time period through the characters. and the descriptions.  If you are studying this period of history, David Copperfield,in my opinion, becomes a primary source.

I hope that English teachers across America are hearing this.  With the coming of Common Core, literature, as such, is deemphasized, and informational text is taking the forefront.  This will affect the high school English Language Arts class more than any other because by high school students will be required do 70% of their daily reading in informational texts including primary sources.  For teachers who love to teach only literature, there is a low outcry.  For those of us who teach history, there won’t be too much change.  History students have to read.  Now it will count as part of the day – reading informational texts, but history (and science) teachers can’t do it all even if they give 100% of their time to reading.  English teachers will still need to spend about 50% of their time in informational text.

As I understand primary sources, they are the fountain of information that historians use to discover the past – to “do” history.  As a “document”, David Copperfield, is a primary source because it is not “about” the past, it IS the past.  Written in 1849-1850 in a series of articles, David Copperfield enables the reader to unravel the past.  The reader experiences the language of the time, the overly polite way that English people conversed tinged with dry humor and a touch of sarcasm.  Through the book the reader  can observe the life of the middle or working class, and understand how desperate life was before there were social safety nets.  They can learn about child labor, and why laws were written to protect the young.  They also learn about the limitations that women, particularly young women, endured, and how women learned to navigate the waters to provide form themselves and their children.  They can view a time before compulsory education.  The book traverses the world.  Several of the characters emigrate to Australia, then still a colony of England.  There they find freedom and financial success. Students should use their map and math skills to realize the magnitude of that move.

This is my argument for using this piece of literature as a primary source, an informational text, if you will.  In order to do this effectively, however, I would also argue that the English teacher needs to partner with the Social Studies teacher in order to teach students how to dig the historical nuggets from the “informational document” rather than merely concentrating on the wonderful story line.  Reading David Copperfield as an informational text has a different purpose, and must be read differently.  The students are now on a quest to discover what life was like in mid 19th century England – and the world.  They need to corroborate the information they glean from reading the period fiction with other non-fiction sources that authenticate the information they read in Dickens’ work.

When reading informational texts, students need to read closely.  They can do a quick read for enjoyment of literature. For a typical language arts class they might read this fiction more  closely to pick the characters apart.  They might look at the way Dickens used words to describe characters, setting, and make an emotional appeal, but rarely do they go beyond that to look at the kinds of employment the characters have.  They probably wouldn’t ask, “What does that employment allow them to do?”  A language arts lesson might point out the social conditions in passing, but the historian might research the various types of employment that were available to men and women of the time.  What were the educational requirements for the choices they had?  Which careers were the most profitable?  Why were the characters who were unsuccessful in England, successful in Australia?  This book is all about economics and geography.

Looking at the Historical Analysis Skills listed in the Framework and in the Common Core Implementation Toolkit that I wrote in conjunction with other history-social studies consultants in California will help the language arts teacher use classics like David Copperfield as a primary source document by asking the analytical historical questions to help students uncover the past.  Or better yet, English teachers could collaborate local history-social studies teacher to plan what literature might help their students understand the time and places they study.

My final argument is that taking literature out of the curriculum for students is not going to help students any more than taking history out of the curriculum.  Students need to learn how to think critically and analyze facts.  Using literature as a primary source is one way to keep both fields viable, and teach students to think for themselves.