Tanka Tuesday: Constellation Trail #Haibun

Tanka Tuesday #224 Poet’s Choice; #Haibun

#Prescott Walk #11 Constellation Trail

Wide trails, narrow trails,
Missed trail? Never lost --- for long,
Perfect wandering

On a perfect February day, we were two of the few hikers wearing a coat. We found easy access to the Constellation Trail at the lower parking lot of the Phippen Museum in Prescott Valley, AZ. We thought that the trails we walked looked a little rugged for our new e-bikes.

Take your time, breathe in
Breathe out, Stretch your arms up high
Touch the sky with health.

The clear air deceives you. It is thinner and takes more effort to breathe for new comers and older hikers. There’s no need to rush. This is not a good trail for runners. Rock outcropping spring up in the middle of the trail. Main trails were marked with white dots.

See the dot on your right?

Blink and you’ve veered off the main loop. One wrong step, and you’re separated from your walking buddy, but not for long. Maps appear out of nowhere. Or use the app on your phone.

If you stay on the broad trails along the mail loop, you can walk it in only 2. 4 miles or less than an hour if you don’t take pictures. We couldn’t resist the views of the Granite Dells, scruffy shrubs, an area of new homes, with the Flagstaff Mountains in the background.

Endorphin blue skies
Daydreaming distant mountains
Cliff structures --- enjoy.
© 2021 Marsha Ingrao Haibun

One side trail that heads up to the top of the dells named The Lost Wall Mountain Biking Trail has only one review – “Not nearly as compelling as photos imply. All slow no flow.” Lost Wall Biking Trail

Vince and I were glad we left our bikes and took only our dog. Kalev enjoyed it.

Happy Blogging This Week.

Poet’s Choice today and Writer’s Quotes Choice tomorrow — It’s as simple as making a meme.

Constellation Trail - view of Granite Dells, Prescott AZ  Sample Meme for Writer's Quotes Wednesdays
Sample Meme for WQWWC Constellation Trail – view of Granite Dells, Prescott AZ

#Tanka Tuesday: #223 Pick a Flower

Poppies posed for a custom color shot.

This Sunday morning I wanted to welcome you to the week through Colleen’s Tanka Tuesday theme prompt – pick a flower!

Precious Poppies

Traditional Haibun © 2021 Marsha Ingrao

Golden beauties glow
Catching sunlight in petals
Close at night to store

We thought we’d have to leave behind our glorious California flower when we moved to Prescott, Arizona.

Lining the entrance
Gold poppies welcome us home
Beaming, cheery spring

The previous owners in our condo planted these carefree smile-makers. Their upstairs neighbors hated them glowing at the bottom of the stairs, and sprayed them with weed-killer.

Persistent joyful
Overcoming obstacles
to garner more sun.

“Who hates a flower?” said Mark, the new neighbor upstairs when he heard the grumpy story. The sour one is gone. Precious poppies survived to reign over the dry earth with the glee of victory.

Precious poppy is about to close for the night.

Also posted for Cee’s FOTD.

Why I Chose the Haibun

A journalist at heart, the Haibun gives me the chance to explain the back story.

Tip: Editing Pictures without Photoshop

This morning I read the list of block types. Editing pictures is a snap. Last month, for Becky B’s BrightSquare Challenge, I struggled to make pictures exactly square in Photoshop Elements 15. I would get between 1-10 pixels off unless it luckily snapped into place. With the block editor you don’t even have to try.

It did not add a watermark and when I cropped it, the old watermark was either cut in half or disappeared.

have a great week. enjoy spring!

Active Problem Solving #Haibun

Turn your photos into stories using different forms of syllabic poetry. Learn how to write poetry through this challenge.

Colleen’s 2020 Weekly #Tanka Tuesday #Poetry Challenge No. 187 #PhotoPrompt

This week Colleen’s #Tanka Tuesday invites us to use all our senses to write about this fishing trap lying abandoned in this lonely inlet.

#Haibun

Nets placed by the hundreds in the harbors. Providing delicious meals for hundreds of people daily. Somehow this single net washed ashore unattended between the lonely crags. Once full of dancing shellfish, crabs or lobsters, now even the birds won’t approach the stench of rotting flesh. Gut wrenching, like watching a young person choose drugs over life.

Ruined

Imprisoned

Wasted

“How did this happen?” the angry father complains to his son. “There ought to be a law against this kind of waste. Don’t the fish companies clean up after themselves? Don’t the harbor patrols get rid of these smelly traps? This is an outrage!”

The son approaches the net, drags it to the water, and empties the rotting lobster inside into the ocean and then calls the local fish company to let them know the location of their missing net.

Action

Concern for

Others

The son placed his arm across his aging father’s shoulders and led him away.

“Remember, Pops? You didn’t complain, rage, or ask me how or why I got hooked on drugs. You stepped in, loved me, and got the help I needed. I didn’t enjoy prison, but I got clean.”

The father relaxed into his son’s embrace as they continued walking wordlessly along the beach.

HAIBUN IN ENGLISH: The rules for constructing a Haibun are simple.  

  • Begin your haibun with a title. The title should hint at something barely noticeable in the beginning which comes together by the ending.
  • Your haibun prose can be written in present or past tense including, first person (I), third person (he/she), or first-person plural (we).
  • Subject matter: autobiographical prose, travel journal, a slice of life, memory, dream, character sketch, place, event, or object. Focus on one or two elements.
  • Keep your prose simple, all excessive words should be pared down or deleted. Nothing should be overstated.
  • The length can be brief with one or two sentences with a haiku, or longer prose with a haiku sandwiched between, to longer memoir works including many haiku.
  • There are different Haibun styles: Idyll: (One prose paragraph and one haiku) haiku/prose, or prose/haiku; Verse Envelope: haiku/prose/haiku; Prose Envelope: prose/haiku/prose, including alternating prose and verse elements.
  • Your prose tells the story and gives the information which helps to define the theme. It creates a mood through tone, paving the way for the haiku.
  • The haiku should act as a comparison—different yet somehow connected to the prose, as it moves the story forward by taking the narrative in another direction.
  • The haiku should not attempt to repeat, quote, or explain the prose. Instead, the haiku resolves the conflict in an unexpected way. Sometimes, the haiku questions the resolution of the prose. While the prose is the narrative, the haiku is the revelation or the reaction.

Take a chance and try something new. Visit Colleen’s Tanka Tuesday. While you are there, check out the other entries for enjoyment, inspiration and to encourage the writers.

#Nonet Spring’s Gift

If you love puzzles and love to write, you are a prime candidate to participate in Colleen’s Tanka Tuesday Poetry Challenge. She specializes in different forms of syllabic poetry.

Colleen’s 2020 Weekly #Tanka Tuesday #Poetry Challenge No. 185, #Poet’sChoice

Introduction

This year spring brought us isolation and gardening at home. Last year spring presented us super blooms on every hillside in California. Hills that stay brown for nine or ten months out of the year, soaked up the precious water and turned bright green. Flowers popped out of nowhere by the side of the road giving us a dazzling display of color.

Puzzling with Poetry

Writing poetry works like a puzzle. You have to play with words, trying to make them convey meaning within the constraints of the form of poetry you are trying to write. 

If you haven’t tried magnetic poetry yet, it’s fun.

The site presents you with a blank screen and a stack of individual words on the right-hand side. You drag and drop the words however you want them on the screen. If you run out, you click, “more words” and keep going.

I used the site to create this Nonet using the words provided in the kit. There are several kits from which to choose, so I chose the nature kit.

When I arranged the words, I mistakenly counted words rather than syllables., so my first attempt is not a true nonet.

This was my original poem, a backwards nonet

Lupines

Spring’s Gift

Season

By color

Bright blue daffodils

Fresh wind sacred bees

Pure nature river stone tree

Gentle, thick vivid, prairie flowers murmur

Sweet poetry – stroll breathe verdant green grass

Secret wild seeds listen and relax beneath Eden’s trunk.

Granted the picture shows lupines rather than daffodils, but that was the word given by the magnet site.

After revision to focus on syllables rather than words, here is how it changed.

Dry Creek Baby Blue Eyes & Friends

Spring’s Gifts

Secret wild seeds listen, relax

Beneath Eden’s husky brown trunk

Gentle, thick prairie flowers

Murmur sweet poetry

Fresh wind, sacred bees

Drone pure nature

By color

Season

Blue

popies and blue eyes

A Nonet

NONET: A Nonet is stanzaic and written in any number of 9-line stanzas with the following syllable count per line: 9-8-7-6-5-4-3-2-1 syllables per line. It can be written on any subject and rhyming is optional, although they are usually unrhymed. Because of the hourglass shape of a double nonet, it’s often used to represent the passage of time.

For additional examples of poetry and a chance demonstrate your own creative talent, head over to Colleen’s and post your prowess in poetry. 🙂

17 Ways to Fill Your Literary Gaps and Ease Boredom While You Shelter At Home in 106 Degrees #Nonet

There’s a solution to enduring the sweltering heat of summer. Let your creativity set you free.

Are you bored/ maybe a tiny bit grumpy trying to stay out of the heat and away from the crowds to avoid the virus?

There’s another way!

Our air conditioner broke two months ago. It was 106 today. Because of COVID-19, the new unit is coming…????? We think it should be here by November. To keep cool in the California sunshine, we watered our garden super well, brought the outdoor cats inside, turned on our ceiling fans and sat down to do as little as possible.

Next problem – boredom.

Not a chance!

Beat Boredom With Poetry

I’ve been updating my series on journaling for the past couple of weeks. Nothing provides as many medical and physiological benefits as journaling.

There’s a problem in journaling, though. Sometimes you stare at a blank page, whether it’s in a book or on your computer screen. Sitting in front of a blank screen has no medicinal advantages.

There’s a solution for blank screens, too. Journaling and writing challenges go together like Forrest Gump and a box of chocolates.

Writing challenges are ubiquitous if you know where to look. My research has led me to several hosts/hostesses. Check out Cee Neuner’s great list of writing challenges.

Today’s challenge hostess for me is Colleen Chesebro.

Seventeen Types of Poetry You’ve Probably Never Tried

  1. Haiku,
  2. Senryu,
  3. Haiga,
  4. Tanka,
  5. Gogyoka,
  6. Tanka Prose,
  7. Haibun,
  8. Cinquain,
  9. Etheree,
  10. Nonet,
  11. Shadorma,
  12. Rondel,
  13. Kyrielle,
  14. Pantoum,
  15. Villanelle,
  16. Limerick,
  17. Found poem

For a fabulous explanation of number one-eleven click on Colleen Chesebro’s Poetry Cheat Sheet.

For the other five, click on the Always Write Cheat Sheet. For even more samples of poetry visit Shadow Poetry.

I am entering a Nonet Found Poem in Colleen’s poetry challenge this week. The rules are to use the following Henry Wadworth Longfellow poem to create your own found poem.

TRADITIONALLY, A FOUND POEM USES ONLY WORDS FROM THE ORIGINAL SOURCE.

Colleen Chesebro

Colleen Chesebro’s Weekly Challenge

This week the challenge is to create a found poem out of these two verses from Longfellow’s poem

A Psalm of Life

What The Heart Of The Young Man Said To The Psalmist

 HENRY WADSWORTH LONGFELLOW

Here is a link to the full poem:
A Psalm of Life by Henry Wadsworth Longfellow | Poetry Foundation

Two Verses to Use in Found Poem Challenge

“…In the world’s broad field of battle, In the bivouac of Life,

Be not like dumb, driven cattle! Be a hero in the strife…”

“…Lives of great men all remind us

We can make our lives sublime,

And, departing, leave behind us

Footprints on the sands of time…”

Henry Wadsworth Longfellow

A Nonet

NONET: A Nonet is stanzaic and written in any number of 9-line stanzas with the following syllable count per line: 9-8-7-6-5-4-3-2-1 syllables per line. It can be written on any subject and rhyming is optional, although they are usually unrhymed. Because of the hourglass shape of a double nonet, it’s often used to represent the passage of time.

Be a Hero

Bivouacs in fields, sublime battle, 

Remind us –  battles – great heroes, 

Leave behind footprints in sands,

Broad battle – strife in fields, 

Not driven cattle, 

Lives sublime make,

Be Heroes,

In Life,

Sands.

I hope you enjoyed my first Nonet Found Poem. For more samples, check out Colleen’s challenge page.

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