How to Find Interesting Buildings and Store Fronts

Here’s your chance to tell your favorite business’ stories, show off magnificent building photography, or thumb through your pictures and enjoy the memories. Your choice – if you play.

#Cee’s Fun Foto Challenge Buildings, Store Fronts

I browsed through hundreds of building pictures before I picked these. Many were much more artistic with statues of dinosaurs, baseball bats in front, windows with shiny mannequins on multi-colored lighted stairs, big cities, historic cities. Decision making was further limited by which photos loaded from my phone, and which clogged it up.

Mostly I found that I’m not a great building photographer. The pictures are usually crocked, and many times parts are cut off. Many of the beautiful buildings I’ve taken, I didn’t label or use, so I could post it, but not say a word about it. I’ll save those for Wordless Wednesday. Instead, I included pictures that had some meaning or memories for me.

Woodlake Hardware Built in 1917

Until about three years ago the 93-year old man who owned this hardware store had worked there since he graduated from high school in 1940 – except for his service in WWII as a glider pilot.

“Argosy” Argonaut Book Shop

You can’t even tell what store this is from my photo, but it was interesting enough to our tour guide that my friend and I returned to the store after the tour. We found boxes of books, not yet for sale. Sleuthing through them we noticed that many were about the water problems in Tulare County, an oddity to find in San Francisco. Stranger still, they had just been donated by the estate of a Tulare County Historical Society friend of mine, Stan Barnes.

This Las Vegas storefront looks unimpressive from the outside, but don’t be fooled. You have to sign in at the table to get inside. The Pawn Stars work here. We didn’t see them, by the way.

This artsy building is the Buckaroo Diner in the town of Three Rivers on the way to the Sequoia National Park. I love turquoise and the food isn’t bad either.

Sometimes you see diners that were boats, but there aren’t too many boats that have been docked and turned into a hotel. You can find it in Old Town Sacramento.

This squarish museum is the perfect front for the museum. Super fascinating place to visit if you love gadgets, robots and cell phone statues. I recommend visiting if you ever go to San Jose.

Click to join the fun.

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Fun Flying from Melbourne to Toowoomba

Fun Foto Big and SmallTuesdays of Texture #loveMelbourne #loveToowoomba #loveAustralia

Australia Travel Series #3

Window Seat Carol’s Sacrifice

Mrs. ET and I flew from Melbourne to Toowoomba on Australia’s Air North. She suggested that I take the window seat. It was a short trip. I would not have to crawl over anyone during the duration. I thanked her, sat down, and buckled up as instructed. As we taxied, I watched the shadow of the plane.

flying high
The plane on the ground created a large shadow

The shadow did not stay large very long!

I do not like to kill birds, but I am proverbially killing two birds with one stone because there are two photo challenges I can do at once with these photos. And I love photo challenges.

In addition to size changes, there are several visible textures. The smooth metal plane, hard concrete, soft green grass, and prickly brown stubbles create a Tuesdays of Texture treat.

flying high
Barely off the ground

But we kept looking. Textures are mellowing out as the shadow continues. The landing gear is still visible, but not for long.

flying-high-in-2017103

Seconds after take-off, the landing gear clicked into place and our shadow streamlined away from the Tullamarine Airport (Melbourne to me). Carol shared that we would be flying into the new Brisbane-West Wellcamp Airport. The airport is located in Toowoomba, Queensland a city of about 120,000.

flying high
Can you still see it?

The plane crossed the highway below the dark rectangle (a parking lot in the middle of farmland???) That represents another change of texture.

The Story of the Brisbane-West Wellcamp Airport

The city of Toowoomba, Queensland has a new privately built airport. The airport is inappropriately named Brisbane-West Wellcamp. Wellcamp had a population of 302 in 2011. Not 302,000, just 302. Brisbane, with a population of 2 million is a two-hour drive from Toowoomba.

This distance might create a problem for bargain hunter travelers who do not know the area. Unknowing travelers might think that would be an alternative airport to Brisbane International find themselves a little farther out-of-town than they planned.

The joke at the time of naming the airport was, “Why not name it Cairns South?” Cairns is a large town north of Toowoomba in the state of Queensland. Never mind that it is an 18 hours drive from Toowoomba. Or maybe they should call the airport Perth-East, a mere 44-hour drive.

Who knows the minds of governments or airport namers?

I hope you enjoyed the shadowy flight of our ride into Brisbane-West Wellcamp.

To see more Fun Fotos or to take part in the Challenge click here.

CFFC runs weekly challenge starting every Tuesday.
CFFC runs weekly challenge starting every Tuesday.

For those who prefer Textures, try this link. This my first time to participate in the texture party.

Photo Challenges Help Bloggers

  1. Photo Challenges Online
  2. Better Blogging with Photography
  3. Australian Gold Rush Australia Travel Series #1
  4. Melbourne’s Walk in the Park Tour: Treasury Gardens  #2

     

Australian Gold Rush in Ballarat, Victoria Then and Now

Fun Foto Old and New, #loveballarat, #ballaratgoldmuseum Ballarat, Australia Travel Series #1

My friends in Australia, The Eternal Traveller, aka Mrs. ET and her husband’s family, escorted me to the Gold Museum in Ballarat. Not to pick up so loose gold, unfortunately, but to learn the history of the Australian Gold Rush.

Aside: We did some panning at Old Sovereign Hill, where I became enormously rich thanks to their generosity.

 

Fun Fotos Old & New, Ballarat Gold Fields

A famous artist at the time, Eugene von Guerard, sketched many pictures of the evolving mine fields in Ballarat. The museum displayed one of them looking in the exact direction at the distant mountain as the window. So I shot a picture of them both at the same time, the old and the new.

For more Old and New visit Cee Neuner’s Fun Fotos site.

CFFC runs weekly challenge starting every Tuesday.
CFFC runs weekly challenge starting every Tuesday.

How Would You Get Into Cliff Dwellings Without Doors?

“Look at this cliff, Darlene.”

#ancienthomes, #cliffdwellings Cee’s Which Way Challenge, Cee’s Fun Foto Challenge – Chutes & Ladders

Built to Last – Cliff Dwellings With Ladders

Limestone made a durable building material. The Sinagua Indians built these ancient homes 800-1,000 years ago.”

“Cool!” Darlene asked, “But most of these cliff-dwellings don’t have an entrance. How did the Sinagua or “Mystery People” get in? There’s another mystery for you.”

Ancient Cliff homes with ladders - Tuzigoot National Monument
Tuzigoot National Monument former homes of the Sinagua, Mystery People

“True enough, Darlene. The cliff dwellings have ladders, though. Maybe they could go out the top. That doesn’t explain how they got to ground level, though.”

Tuzigoot Cliff Dwellings & Museum

Tourism boomed Thanksgiving holiday weekend at Tuzigoot National Monument. A ranger stood next to the checkout clerk at the museum. He answered questions from young visitors who had been on the trail. They completed Tuzigoot Booklet to earn the Junior Ranger badges.

Tuzigoot Monument Cliff Dwelling story board
“Excavating is like tearing out every page after you read it. If you miss a clue and don’t take good notes, you can never go back for a second look at how things were before you dug them up.” National Ranger Book

“He’s been up here four times. When they finish the Ranger Book, then we fill out the certificate, swear them in. Presto! They become a Junior Ranger.

Pottery from cliff dwellings at Tuzigoot.
Pieces of pottery are called sherds, sometimes called shards.

The museum told the Sinagua story in displays and artifacts. Archeologists noted six styles of pottery. For example, there were 108 complete bowls of undecorated plainware. But they found only four sherds of Tularosa Black-on-White pottery.

Artifacts found in cliff dwellings
Student-friendly signs made exploration easy.

In & Out – Cliff Dwellings Offered Plenty to Explore

Cliff Dwellings before excavation
Imagine finding this mound.

Tuzigoot National Monument is a large pueblo. We would not know about the cliff dwellings without excavating. Archeologists in 1933-1934 took out 5,000 cubic yards of earth. The National Park Service does not excavate often anymore. When the dirt is removed, artifacts leave their natural settings, never to go back exactly as they were before.

Tuzigoot Cliff Dwellings in 2016

Stops along the way explain the process of excavation. At the top of the grassy incline stands the Tuzigoot Pueblo.

Darlene reading a cliff dwelling marker
Markers told the history of the Sinagua Indians, the results of copper mining on the valley, and explained the cliff dwellings.

A slight chill in the breeze kept us comfortable in our coats. As we walked along, we could see the building walls. Even though they were not complete, we could see no doors.

Cliff dwellings in Tuzigoot Pueblo
Today we can see only the foundations or lowest levels of the cliff dwellings.

The broad paved path encircles the cliff dwellings. I rate this path a 1, the easiest level. Wheel-chair-patients cannot climb the ladders inside the cliff dwellings to the top-level. However, they can see cliff dwellings from almost every angle.

Top level of the Tuzigoot Cliff Dwellings
To climb the ladder to the top-level of the cliff dwellings must have been difficult for the elderly.

From the top, the “Mystery People” could see a long way. We could see the historic mining towns of  Jerome, Cottonwood, and Clarkdale, AZ. Little did the ladder people know what would happen to their beloved marsh as a result of copper mining. Nor did American copper miners know what destruction they created.

map of cliff peoples in Verde Valley, AZ

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What Makes a Cottage Magical?

#NaBloPoMo #Winterthur#3 #Delawaretrip

The odd-shaped thatched roof?

Cee’s Fun Foto Challenge: Week 46 Roofs

It was morning; through the high window I saw the pure, bright blue of the sky as it hovered cheerfully over the long roofs of the neighboring houses. It too seemed full of joy, as if it had special plans, and had put on its finest clothes for the occasion.                Herman Hesse

On this September day the sky, though blue, filtered through the trees until it became transparent, blending into the enchantment of the forest in the Winterthur Gardens.

I looked for the pictures I remembered taking on that magical day as I strolled with Hal, but they weren’t there. Have you ever had that happen?

You know, you just know, that picture is somewhere, but it’s not.

I am persistent. I found the picture of the medieval English-style roof I wanted to share with you. But it’s a video! Woe is me!

This quick post turned into a two-hour ordeal. I shortened the video (a new skill). Next, I added some beautiful bird sounds chirping after the rain cleared the air that I downloaded for free. Google helped me learn how to erase my own boring intriguing narration which I had already chopped to bits when I cropped the video. Finally, I uploaded it to YouTube.

If you are wondering about the woven branches, I’m not standing on a twig roof shooting this video. Hal and I are standing opposite the enchanted cottage in a gigantic roofless bird’s nest replete with three wooden eggs the shape of king-sized watermelons.

The little box on my YouTube channel tells me that I now have 56 videos. Guess how many followers I have of my YouTube channel?

Back to the thatched roof

Once I finished the video, I learned about thatched roofs. I looked for roof shapes so I could be more precise. After I searched through all the common roof shapes, thatched and cottage finally paired.

Guess what?

Thatched roofs are odd-shaped. Duh! No wonder they are so quaint.

Although they once denoted poverty, the wealthy put thatched roofs on their homes to be more eco-friendly. Did you know that thatched roofs can last up to 50 years? The English used thatched roofs from available resources such as dried vegetation like straw, water reed, sedge, rushes, or heather. Experts contend that thatched roofs do not burn as easily as some roofing materials.

Maybe it’s thatched, and maybe it’s not

This simple Woodlake home looks elegant with a cottage-style roof.

 English cottage style
English cottage style

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So what do you think makes a cottage magical?