Awkward Seating Starring in #CBWC

#Any Kind of Seating

Cee’s Black and White Challenge invitation this week was to take pictures of any kind of seating.

Do you remember crawling over people to get to your seat in a theatre? I took this before the start of “Ka” in Las Vegas in February, 2020 when finding your seat in the dark when the show was two seconds from starting was awkward.

These beach chairs our son discarded at our house when he moved were awkward to use. You had to straddle the chair and drop into it. I demonstrated to one of our garage sale customers and he bought it. I guess he figured if I could get into it anyone could.

Now, if you want to experience awkward, imagine getting out of this seat after rowing all morning with your legs 90 degrees from your back. Mine didn’t work at all, and my friend Diane and her daughter had to roll me out of the kayak.

Sitting at my desk admitting that this was my first try at color popping is awkward. I used Photoshop Elements 15 – Guided. When I finished the hills, Diane’s hat, face, and arms were still tan. I used the lasso tool and added tons of adjustment layers to erase most of the offensive residual color after the pop. It was an awkward way to achieve the purpose, I’m sure.

I had nothing on these two dolls at the Best of the Valley Quilt Show. They look serene and cool in their deep turquoise pop of color, but deep inside I think their legs are all twisted into an awkward pretzel shape.

My third try using the pop feature was this wistful doll sitting awkwardly on her tiny chair with her tinier marionette.

So what’s your favorite seat or do you like to sit down? Join Cee’s Black and White Challenge and see what other folks are doing.

Here are a couple of examples besides Cee’s that inspired me to go beyond park benches.

2020: An Historic Year of Views Outside Our Home

#Cee’s Black and White Photo Challenge Outside of Your Home or View.

The world will remember the year twenty-twenty with twenty-twenty clarity. For Cee’s Black and White Challenge this week, I decided to choose one picture outside our home for each month that I had a picture beginning in January.

January, 2020

I got carried away with January’s photos.

Playing with Photoshop near midnight makes some people act strangely. Puppy Girl still acts the same with a Threshold Filter.

Puppy Girl loves these cool damp days. She explores the dry creek bed Vince created nearly twenty years ago as though she had never seen it before.

Each year Vince adds a new touch to the house. This year he outdid himself starting with this pathway created from the left-over cement he took out of the garage when he created the cabana sixteen years ago or so. Puppy Girl does what she does best. I added a bit of a green filter to this photo. January is the only month I’ve seen moss growing on the concrete.

February, 2020

On this February morning we could almost see each individual snow flake on the mountainside. By August we didn’t have mountains. For this shot, I shot blind by raising my hands as high as I could and shooting. It wasn’t a professional shot, but I got above all the fencing and the neighbor’s buildings across the creek.

March, 2020

In March Moji relaxes and enjoys her breakfast with the elephant outside the room. This table is right outside our dining room, and we rarely use it except to feed our cats where we can watch them eat. I love the shadowy patterns on the patio.

April, 2020

Who knew this would be the last April picture I would photograph the outside of the home where we have lived and completely renovated continuously for almost twenty years.

May, 2020

In May through June we completed the garden project we started last year, including the addition 1966 dump truck as yard art. We had lots of time to work because of COVID and sheltering in place. It never seemed like a hardship during those first few months. We were way too busy to even care too much when our air conditioning unit died. We did not know that COVID would make finding a replacement more difficult than finding toilet paper.

June, 2020

By June the temperatures climbed into the 100s. The plants did not seem to mind as long as I watered them every day. I preferred to do that early and stay in my office and look outside at them from the house. Unfortunately we did not have air conditioning during the month of June. So Vince installed a window air conditioner in the living room and it was bearable if we did not do much. We were still sheltering at home.

July, 2020

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At the end of July, a company out of Porterville, CA installed the air conditioner that had gone out on May 2. They neglected to hook the condenser pipe to anything inside the attic, and water poured into the attic for several days before it soaked through the ceiling of our spare room. The process Service Master took to dry out the room, remove all the drywall, bit by bit, bag it up and purify the air to remove any possible sign of mold lasted another month and a half.

August, 2020

August and September brought forest fires our way. Parts of our neighboring town, Three Rivers, had to evacuate. We were more fortunate. Our air conditioning now worked which was excellent since the air outside was not fit to breath. It fell from the sky in chunks and turned the sunrise a bright red. You can barely see it trying to peek through the smoke.

September, 2020

My husband is a perfectionist worrier, which I count as a blessing. Since the installers had done such a poor job with the condenser pipe, Vince called in a roofer and another air conditioner installer to make sure they had not damaged the roof or created any other damage that might cause more leakage once it started to rain. They both said, “Uh, yeah, this wasn’t done right. You have some issues.” We could see the hole in the roof and the fact that there was a large gap between the air conditioner and the roof. So in September the roofers came and worked. We didn’t need to keep sheltering at home, the world came to us.

October, 2020

During the course of events that careened through our lives, we decided to fulfill a longtime wish and move to the high desert. We both loved Prescott every time we visited, and in October we sold the home into which we had poured twenty years of our dreams.

As a part of the sale of the property, we had to insure that the septic and leach lines worked properly. That meant some more work to the outside of the house. I couldn’t even watch, but Vince took a video. Warning: It’s not black and white!

Thank you Cee for offering us this opportunity to share a little bit of our lives with you and those who follow you.

To my readers, please visit Cee and don’t forget to check out some of the other great entries as well. #Cee’s Black and White Photo Challenge Outside of Your Home or View

Horn Your Way Into This Conversation

Cee Neuner’s challenges force photographers to think outside the box to get their photos for the week. What “horns” would you post today?

#Black&WhitePhotoChallenge, #horns, #cattle #bugleboys

Tulare County cattle rank high on the importance scale. Cows here outnumber people.

In Visalia and the west side of the county, most of the cattle are dairy cows. Towards the foothills, where we live, you see range cattle, beef stock.

That’s no bull selling pomegranate juice.

This hefty fellow resides in Three Rivers, California. He’s been drinking too much pomegranate juice recently and has deteriorated since I took this picture. Since when do cows advertise pomegranate juice?

Don’t let those shy, downcast lashes fool you.

Ever wonder what a cow looks like when it first wakes up? A little sleepy, just like we do.

Baby horns

Horns grow from one to three inches a month when cattle are young. Normally they run so fast when they are young, I can’t get a good picture of them, but this little one had an itch or something that slowed it down. Lucky for me!

Freeway horns

My husband and I couldn’t believe our eyes. However, not a horn honked as this majestic animal marched across the freeway outside of Las Vegas enjoying his lunch as he walked. You know he’s not fake because he left his shadow on the road.

Our friend Jack Pizura had a pipe dream. He created a marching band from scraps. As you drive up to their bed and breakfast, these charming bugle boys greet you. You can’t help grinning back.

They never get nervous playing their horns when you get in their faces. or when an icky web covers their eyes.

The spiders enjoy the music.

I loved how the fingers curled around the “horn.” Jack’s attention to details personalize his stick figures. They have formal turned down collars, and big brass bell buttons down their uniforms.

Their see through heads allow you to get an insider’s view to playing a trumpet.

Jack generously had his personal collection of horns laid out on the dining room table for me when I arrived this afternoon. He named each of the types of horns and I should have taken notes. (LOL) The one that looks like a space ship is made of plastic. It doesn’t play well, but he painted it, and it looked ready to take off.

Thank you, Jack, for displaying your horn collection for me and allowing me to photograph your adorable statues.

Hope you enjoyed my choices of horns for the day.

For more horns check into Cee’s Black and White Challenge.

Related Post

#Cee’s B & W Challenge: Feet

Would you want to walk in their shoes? Check out these feet.

#Cee’s Black and White Challenge

Two feet

Six feet, stand off

Claw feet, web feet, spikey

Toes, my feet, your feet, stand alone

As friends

Cinquain – Marsha Ingrao

Gatorland 101 Watch Your Feet

I learned in one of my photography classes that amateur photographers have a tendency to cut off feet when they take pictures. Oops. Now I am more aware of feet, but I still do it. Thanks for the reminder, Cee.

Here are some photos I took in Gatorland when my neighbors and I went two years ago.

“If you so much as open your mouth while I’m talking to you, I’ll claw you right off this ramp.”

I don’t think I’d be talking such brave talk if I was standing on the ramp with a gator. Birds feel safer than we do here because alligators are their friends and protectors. Their friends keep out raccoons, snakes and other predators that might otherwise devour the eggs and chicks. 

“Hey, my feet do not stink! You’re feet stink.”

What in the world are they all trying to find? Bird stew isn’t on the menu.

“A little to the left and down a bit. Ah, that feels great. I could just take a nap.”

This alligator is getting a very expensive massage. We were all invited to come down and give it a try if we wanted to. The four of us decided against it.

More Information on Gatorland

14501 S Orange Blossom Trl, Orlando, FL 32837

Hope you enjoyed my Gator Tale. For more black and white feet check out Cee’s photo challenge for this week. https://ceenphotography.com/cees-black-white-challenge/. Get ready for horns next week.

Related Posts

If you know someone who hosts a writing or photo challenge, please contact me. I am compiling a list of challenges. I don’t want to leave people out. If you want to host a challenge, read some of the interviews of hosts who do and what they do to be successful.

Have a great week!

Seven Storefronts to See on Your Way to Sequoia National Park

Storefronts with Signs Abound

I travel a lot.

I photograph buildings all over the country, but so do you. You even live in some of the places I’ve traveled, and probably have much better pictures of the buildings than I have.

But I bet most of you do not photograph Woodlake, CA. Gotcha, didn’t I?

A Little History of Woodlake

Woodlake began in 1912 as a tourist town nestled away from the beaten path surrounded by the Sierra Nevada foothills. If you head east from Woodlake, you will reach Sequoia National Park. Going through Woodlake is one of the beautiful back ways to get there.

A few of the original 1900s buildings still stand downtown.

This year Woodlake celebrates 75 years of incorporation. Not many of the small towns in Tulare County are incorporated, so it’s a big deal for us. We are having a huge We-R-Woodlake celebration September 23-25th, so things R changin’ round-about Woodlake.

Main Street Woodlake

Woodlake has one north-south main street called Valencia Boulevard, named after a type of orange, which is one of Woodlake’s main crop. The east-west main street which intersects Valencia in the 2016 round-about, is named Naranjo Boulevard (pronounced na rawn’ ho). Some Woodlakers pronounce it (na raw’ no). Naranjos are a different species of oranges.

Three years ago I snapped these pictures before Woodlake underwent a major remodel. One day when the sky is not muddy I’ll go back and do a more thorough job of documenting our buildings and streets as they look now.

Woodlake Hardware Built in 1917 taken in 2013.
This new Woodlake Hardware building was built in 1917. This picture and the article about Morris Bennet, the 92-year-old owner, attracted Arcadia Publishing to me. A random article resulted in a book, Images of America: Woodlake. In this case, a picture was worth 18,000 words, and 210 more pictures.

In 2015 Morris and his children wanted to retire but hung in there until the building and business sold. Oral E. Micham, Inc. thrilled city and surrounding residents when he bought the business. Morris still comes to work. He started in 1940 the year he graduated from Woodlake High School. 🙂

No offence, Baldo. I just think it's funny to have a barbershop named Baldo's.
No offense, Baldo. I think it’s funny to have a barbershop named Baldo’s. Even baldos need a hair cut from time to time. 🙂

This is one of the older buildings in Woodlake. Most of the buildings were brick because of fire danger.
This is one of the older buildings in Woodlake. Most of the buildings built in the early 1900s  were constructed of brick because of fire danger.

Bank of America built a new building when the "brick block" on the corner was torn down in 1961. Newer buildings are stucco.
Bank of America had to move when the  1912 “brick block” on the corner was torn down in 1961. Some of the newer buildings are at least covered in stucco. Bank of America closed in 1985 and Valley Business Bank took over the banking needs in Woodlake some time later.

Notice the original brick. I think they did a creative job of including the past when they update it.
Notice the original brick. I think they did a creative job of including the past when they updated it.

Cinderblock buildings do not burn easily. Dick Edmiston erected this government building in the late 1960s.
Cinderblock buildings do not burn easily either. Dick Edmiston erected this government building in the late 1960s.

The Gongs bought Haury's Market, the Liquor Store and the Theatre in the 1960s and created the General Food Store.
The Gongs bought Haury’s Market, the Liquor Store, and the Theatre in the 1960s and opened the General Food Store. The well-equipped fire station just down the road protects the wood structure. General Food reflects the western motif of the town.

Those are not all the buildings along our main street, Valencia Boulevard, but they are the some of the bigger ones. Several new businesses have come to Woodlake since I took these pictures. Time changes even the small sleepy town of Woodlake, the Western Mayberry.

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For more entries in Cee’s B & W Challenge, click on her image.

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Other articles you might enjoy about Woodlake.