#Sunday Stills: Feeding Birds in Australia

Australian Trip #21

Today in Sunday Stills Terri from Second wind leisure challenged us to feed the birds. I whined to Janis about never having any beautiful bird pictures. But after searching in my files for birds, up came some files tagged “bird.” Tags are so cool.

Australian King Parrot
I’m not sure if this is a female, but females are a little less colorful.

Four years and a month ago Glen and Carol took me to the Bunya Mountains to see amazing Australian wild life. Feeding time for these colorful time was exact and we got there in time to watch the birds fly from the trees and land near the food bowls, which you could purchase.

Australian crimson rosela bird
Very tame

It did not bother me at all that we had not purchased a bowl of food. The beauties had plenty.

Australian crimson rosela bird
A little nervous

Not ever feeder was equally excited about having the birds in such close proximity. Some of them had to be coaxed and coached by their adult supervisors to get them to step up to the plate.

Australian King Parrot
“Could you hold the tin steady, Ma’am?”

After a little demonstration, feeding time got calmer. The people, not the birds. The birds were as excited as ever, though you can’t tell by their expressions.

Australian crimson rosela bird
Sunday Stills Bunya Mountain Treasure

“These colorful parrots from Australia are in the genus PlatycercusPlatycercus means “broad-tailed” or “flat-tailed”, reflecting a feature common to the rosellas and other members of the broad-tailed parrot tribe. Their diet is mainly seeds and fruit.”

Wikipedia
Australian crimson rosela bird
The ground works, too.

The rosella parrots did not mind picking their food off the ground. The thirty second rule applied here.

Australian crimson rosela bird
How am I supposed to tell which is the most nutritious?

It took about a half hour for most of the food to disappear. I wonder if any of it germinates and produces its own food for the birds.

I hope you enjoyed this short walk down memory lane in the Bunya Mountains with Glen, Carol and me.

SS Logo
Sunday Stills Logo

Wow, look at all the other brave souls that got close enough to shoot bird pictures. (or had a long lens). This is my reading material for tomorrow. Join me, would you?

I missed these wonderful entries until 2-28.

  1. Now At Home
  2. Cee’s Photo Challenges
  3. Pictures Without Film
  4. Our Eyes Open
  5. Stevie Turner
  6. 365days Blog
  7. Bend Branches
  8. Easin’ Along
  9. Idaho Bluebird
  10. Light Write Life
  11. Mazee Puran
  12. hold-fast-to-dreams.jpg (1920×1440) (wordpress.com)
  13. The Day After
  14. The World is a Book
  15. Travel with Me
  16. Women Living Well After 50
  17. Woolley Muses
Bitmoji

Have a great week. See you Tuesday for the Summary of Story Chat.

#Lens-Artist Photo Challenge #136 The Letter “S”

Prescott Walk #6 Willow Lake Trail

Hi Friends,

Thanks for joining me on another Prescott Walk through the Lens Artist Photo Challenge.

“For this week’s Lens-Artists Photo Challenge #136, we’re circling back to the alphabet.  This time, we’re going to focus on the letter S.  What images can you find that feature a subject that begins with the letter S?”

Willow Lake, Prescott,
Sign

Vince and I wanted a bigger challenge that we walked the first few times we went around Willow Lake. The sign tells you how difficult/scary the trail is and we decided to try something substantially technical.

Willow Lake, Prescott,
Shadow, Spot

All we had to do was to follow the white spots on the rocks. Usually they were very visible even in the shadows. Sometimes there were slippery rocks and my feet aren’t super stable. I was somewhat nervous about climbing a technical trail.

Willow Lake, Prescott,
Slippery Vince says, “You won’t slip on these rock, Marsha.”

Vince, on the other hand, smiled serenely at my fear, spread his arms to assure me that I would be secure on that slippery trail.

Vince was right. I slowly scaled the rocks to his surveillance point at the top. What a spectacular view of the surrounding countryside! Willow Lake is on a substantially busy Prescott street, but you scarcely notice it from the trail. Scrambling up the rocks, you could see it in the distance.

Willow Creek, which feeds Willow Lake had come alive after the snow and snaked its way across the weeds. In 1935 the Civilian Conservation Corps built the Willow Creek Dam as a public works project.

Willow Lake, Prescott,
Shadow, Spots, Stripes, Snapshot

Vince’s shadow blends in with the stripes on the rock as he spots a superior snapshot.

Back on solid ground again, we searched strategically for specific items that might scratch us -like cactus stickers. They looked spectacular as sunlight shone through them.

We spied other spectators on the Willow Lake trail. These strangers let us snap their pictures as they staggered up the slope.

Someone surpassed us on a side path and surveyed it by staking pencils ever few inches until they ran out of pencils. Vince named it the Lápiz Trail.

Other “S” Posts You Might Enjoy

Coming Next Week

  • Sunday Stills
  • Story Chat Summary of “The Trophy Cabinet” It’s not too late to leave your comment.
  • How to Organize Your Photos with yours and Lisa Coleman’s best tips
  • #Writer’s Quotes Wednesdays Writing Challenge
  • More Prescott Walks

For All These Posts to Matter

Bitmoji

Have a great week.

Marathon or Sprint Posting? Tagging My Prescott Walks-Peavine Trail Photos or Not?

#Prescott Walk 5: Peavine Trail

Welcome, friends to Prescott Walk #5 (I think – I have trouble labeling them, so I’ve lost count already!)

Lisa Coleman, the Bird Weekly Lady and I, together with several of you, are working on a post for next week about organizing photos. The topic that came up repeatedly is about tagging. Lisa is working on an easy way to do it.

Since I moved my Always Write site from WordPress.org to this site last March, I’ve been lax about tagging my photos. So this is my tagging marathon march along Peavine Trail, dedicated to Hugh Roberts with a tag, caption, title and description for every picture.

“Remember – blogging is a marathon, not a sprint.”

Hugh Roberts
Peavine Trail, Prescott
Beginning of the Peavine Trail and Prescott Fire Department Training area

The Ingraos have lived in Prescott three months and somehow missed this beautiful trail only 1.5 miles from our home. Built on the Santa Fe, Prescott & Phoenix railway bed, the trail is flat, wide and safe for walkers and bikers, or those who, like Restless Jo, “Talk to the trees.”

The city now owns the property and along the right side of the trail you can see some of the city’s dumping grounds as well as the Police and Fire training area. That doesn’t impair its natural beauty. Cottonwood trees would obliterate anything remotely unattractive in the summer.

Peavine Trail, Prescott
First peek of the south end of Watson Lake from the start of Peavine Trail accessible off Prescott Lakes Parkway and Highway 89 across from the Sewage Treatment Plant on Sundog Ranch Road.

Part of a 126 acre Riparian Preserve, Watson Woods borders Peavine Trail on the left as you head north from the parking lot. For the most part there are Willows, three kinds of Cottonwood trees, and other flexible shrubs in the preserve.

Peavine Trail, Prescott
Close up of ducks in Granite Creek making slurping sounds – very muddy

Several kinds of ducks lounge and dip into the murky water as they forage for food along the banks of Granite Creek, which runs into Watson Lake. I included this picture of ducks for my new friend/expert photo organizing/ host of the Bird Weekly Challenge, Lisa Coleman. Last week’s challenge was “birds you love.” I love any bird that will sit still long enough for me to take their picture. These birds cooperated with no signs of shyness. If you look closely, you might find a smile.

Peavine Trail, Prescott
We walked between the formations on broad railway bed.

As we continued down Peavine Trail, named for its windiness, we imagined what it was like for the workers carving a narrow path between the Granite Rocks for the SF & P & P Railway.

Chartered on May 27, 1891,”the SFP&P’s 195-mile (314 km) line extended the Santa Fe Railway south into Phoenix. The SFP&P extended another 100 miles (160 km) to the east from Phoenix to Florence and Winkelman via the Phoenix and Eastern Railroad (which would become a Southern Pacific Railroad subsidiary in 1907).” Wikipedia

Peavine Trail, Prescott
Looking up at a formidable Granite Dells rock formation.

I asked Vince if he wanted to climb up the Granite Dells formation, and he said, “I don’t have the right shoes.”

Uh huh, and I don’t have the right feet. He might have been trying to protect my pride. Just beyond this barrier, if you could have seen through it, Granite Creek becomes Watson Lake. “Named after named for Senator James Watson, Indiana, who invested in Chino Valley irrigation projects, (this picturesque lake) resulted from the 1916 damming of Granite Creek.” Sign on Peavine Trail.

Peavine Trail Prescott
A lone patch of snow remains in the shadows of the Granite Dells and shade trees.

Since we had a record snowfall according to our neighbors, not the weather channel, friends have asked if we still have snow. The answer is a resounding yes. Here it is in the valley of the shadow of the SF & P & P Railway.

Since this is a marathon, not a sprint, you will see more photos from our two walks over the next few weeks. We logged about 18,000 steps each in our two days of exploration along the Peavine Trail.

Remember

Thank you, Bitmoji
  • Today is the last day to participate in the Sue Vincent Rodeo Classic. All donations go to support her and her family in this difficult time.
  • Only a few more days to comment on “The Trophy Cabinet” by Geoff LePard. Your comments will appear in The February edition of Story Chat on Tuesday.
  • It’s not to late to contribute your thoughts and quotes about Responsibility for this week’s Writer’s Quotes Wednesdays Writing Challenge.
  • Coming next Friday the long-anticipated interview with photographer, Lisa Coleman about how to organize your photos. This helpful post will also feature your tips.
Thank you, Bitmoji

Thanks for joining me, friends.

#Sunday Stills, #Lens-Artists 133 My Landscape Journey Started with Dad

Terri Webster Schrandt who hosts Sunday Stills invites us to post our favorite landscapes. Amy from Lens-Artists shared her photographic journey and invites us to do the same.

Dad and Randy (6’3″) in front of an Indiana snowbank in the 70’s

Childhood Photography

My dad didn’t get much credit for doing good things in my life, but one thing I appreciated was his love and talent for photography. He started taking me with him on photo shoots when I was ten.

“You’ve got the eye for what makes a good picture, Marsha.”

I was over the moon with that compliment for the rest of my life.

Neither my brother nor I have his expertise, but we share the love of photography. I don’t know who took this picture of my dad and brother but it came from Dad’s slide collection.

Before Blogging

Shortly after Mom died, Randy and I took our first vacation alone together. We started out at one of our favorite stomping grounds Cascade Locks, Oregon. We at at our favorite hamburger joint looking out at the Bridge of the Gods.

The Bridge of the Gods is a toll bridge spanning the Columbia River to connect SR-14 in Washington to I-84 in Oregon. The bridge is owned and operated by the Port of Cascade Locks in the city of Cascade Locks.

As I picked out my favorite landscape pictures throughout the most prolific years of my life, I noticed I have a propensity to take pictures of bridges. Our next stop was Depoe Bay on the Oregon Coast. Much of the time the Oregon coast is cloudy and gray. We couldn’t have had a more perfect day for taking photos.

After Blogging

Until I started blogging, and taking digital photos, I did not take the volume of pictures I take now. Leanne and Carol, two Australian bloggers made a huge difference in my photography and my writing. I went to see them in December of 2016-January of 2017. These next pictures may not be landscape photos, but they are part of my photographic journey.

By the way, Russel Ray taught me about how to do frames and create a signature. For some reason, the size I’ve been using forever seems huge in comparison to my photos. You’ll find a few less annoyingly narcissistic-sized signatures. I am lazy and didn’t want to redo all my photos a third time.

For one photo shoot Leanne Cole picked us up at about 4:00 and drove us to the Docklands. The weather that December day was cool and breezy, a perfect summer evening for taking pictures.

Primarily a waterfront area centered on the banks of the Yarra River, the Docklands was originally swamp land that became a busy dock area as part of the Port of Melbourne in the 1880s. It fell into disuse by the 1990s and was revived into the bustling entertainment area in the late 1990s and early 2000s.

The Webb Bridge in Docklands, Melbourne, Victoria, Australia is my favorite bridge in the world. It felt like we were walking on the inside of a slinky. Everywhere Leanne stopped, I stopped and clicked about a third of the number of pictures she took. Carol and Christine, another photographer with us, found their own way. Leanne taught me the rule of thirds, keeping my pictures straight, not chopping off people’s feet, keeping the shadow’s off people’s faces and many more basic composition tools.

The U.S. Journey

As is probably evident, I have not had much photographic training. I took a wildflower class where I learned to take macros with my Canon Rebel and how to use a tripod. This picture came from Tulare County at Norris Ranch east of Porterville, CA. Tulare County Office of Education owns this property and uses it for student research.

Since we’re in Tulare County, where I called home for 35 years, let’s continue our virtual journey there at Bellavista, the name we gave our home in Woodlake, CA. where we lived for twenty years. In the background are the foothills of the Sierra Nevada Mountains.

Twelve miles east of us, Kaweah Lake, provides a beautiful prelude to the Sequoia National Park. Terminus Dam created the lake from one of the steepest inclined rivers in the U.S. Built in the 1960s it controls floods and provides water for the many acres of farmland in the valley.

Almost everyone has been to Yosemite, National Park in Fresno County. I had the fortune of going here with an artist. I noticed what pictures she took and I aimed in the same direction. Hers turned into beautiful paintings. Mine are here.

This is another photo I like taken at Avila Beach when Carol and Glen came from Australia to stay with us for a week.

This is a favorite landscape of mine in Maui, Hi. The place to eat there for a special occasion is Mama’s Fish House. This is the view from the open windows. The light ocean breeze feels just as scrumptious as the ocean view and the food they serve.

Come on now, you can’t stay in Hawaii for ever. But I’m not going to bring you back to reality just yet. Let’s go to Sedona. The first picture, one of those golden hour shots, showed up right at our resort, Los Abrigados. I’m not sure of the name of the rock formation.

One of the reasons we moved to Prescott, was the beautiful rock formations in Arizona. I will have photo shoots for years to come.

This will be my last shot for the post. It comes from Wilmington, Delaware where I visited my mother’s first cousin, Hal. He spent his career working for DuPont as a chemical engineer creating plastic that is used in car engines. In Delaware, DuPont is all over the map.

By 1802 DuPont had begun making the explosive in a mill on the Brandywine River near Wilmington. The DuPont company became a major supplier to the U.S. military. After a tour of the museum/factory. We roamed around outside where I enjoyed the placid-looking Brandywine River.


Announcements

  • This month our  Story Chat features author Anne Goodwin and her short story, “A Post Card from the Past.” Summary coming up Friday. Enough time for you to get your quotable thoughts in.
  • Coming up February 9, a new short story: “Trophy Cabinet” for Story Chat from Geoff LePard from TanGental.
  • Join us for the Sue Vincent Rodeo Classic at the Carrot Ranch – a contest, parade, and celebration all in one! There are many ways to participate. One is to visit the prompt image, “Hidden”, at the Carrot Ranch. The prompt image and entry form will go live on Monday, February 1st, 2021. Enter a flash or a poem by Friday, February 19th, 2021, and you could win either $100 or a copy of one of Sue’s books. The form will allow you to give a small donation for Sue and her family, and a link can be found on the contest page. The winning entries will be announced at the Carrot Ranch on March 22nd, 2021.
  • #WQWWC – Respect and Courtesy February 3 here on my blog. There’s still time to write your post for this week on Trust.
  • Frank from Beach Walk Reflections, will host the Writer’s Quotes Wednesday Writing Challenge –Love on February 10th.
  • Frank, is also looking for photographers to collaborate with him on his website. He writes but wants to promote your photographs. It’s a great opportunity for fun and exposure. Contact him here. Collaborators – Beach Walk Reflections: Thoughts from thinking while walking (wordpress.com)

Have a wonderful week.

Followers Tag Along on Restless Jo’s Walks

Challenge Host Interview # 11

Good morning friends, and welcome, Restless Jo, to my blog, Always Write. I am honored to have you as a guest on my blog. I met you through my friend Carol, The Eternal Traveler, when I started blogging in 2012. When did you start blogging, Jo? 

Where did it all start?  I began, very tentatively, to blog in September 2011.  I’ve always loved to write, but technology isn’t something I took to with ease.  Ask my long suffering husband!  He’s my IT ‘expert’ but with no experience of, or interest in, the world of blogging.  I simply wanted to tell my travel stories.  Once I got the hang of blogging, I wanted to do it ‘my way’.  

Note: To find Restless Jo’s current posts enter 2021 in the search box.

https://restlessjo.me/2018/07/09/jos-monday-walk-that-bridge-and-beyond/

“Got the hang of blogging,” like this guy? Perfect picture. I’d like to be that good at blogging, but I don’t quite have the hang of it. 🙂

So how did you do it?

This usually involved mooching around in my northeast of England neck of the woods, and sharing what I found.  Although it introduced me to lots of people, I found the challenge method of blogging restrictive.  If I have something to say I value the freedom to say it, in my own way.  I guess most people who start challenges do so because they have control over the subject matter.  I struggle now to recall most of my early posts, but I know that I was always conscious of wanting my own voice.

I think I understand wanting to find your voice and doing it your own way, Jo. I wanted to write, thought I knew how to write, but I remember the days of zero to five readers. I began to question what was wrong with “my way.” I wondered what I should write about that people would want to read. I had a hard time finding my voice. It sounds like you started blogging a mind full of ideas about what to write. 

https://restlessjo.me/2018/09/10/jos-monday-walk-a-tale-of-three-castles-2-alnwick/

Yes, I did. Back in 2004 we had purchased a house in the Algarve.  Exploring that region, with the addition of my Polish family story and visits to Poland, gave me plenty of material to write about.  I had A-Z pages dedicated to the Algarve and Poland, and used them to share the culture and personal anecdotes relating to those countries.  Looking back, the blog was ‘bitty’ and I felt I needed a direction.  

So how did you arrive at the name of Restless Jo and the Monday Walks?

https://restlessjo.me/2017/03/06/jos-monday-walk-ponte-vecchio/

Wherever I went, I always walked.  I don’t drive, and it was my style of exploring.  And blogging about the walks became a good way to share almost anything.  So, in March 2014, Jo’s Monday Walk was born.  The posts were far from being ‘start here at point A and continue till you reach point B 2 hours later’.  They were just me, doing what I do best- walking and talking.  

I love that – both walking and talking, kind of like this interview. 

What’s Up, Doc? | restlessjo

 

I found it came very naturally, and people seemed to respond easily to that.  Depending on the subject, I usually included rough whereabouts and direction, but seldom with the thought of anyone walking in my footsteps.  It was my bit of escapism, and was thrown open to the public as just that.  Anyone could contribute what they thought of as a walk.  Sometimes it might only be a couple of photos and a thought or two.  Other times it went into great detail.  I didn’t mind.  It was just fun, and it gave me a way to post whatever or wherever I wanted.

How did you come up with the name of Restless Jo?

https://restlessjo.wordpress.com/2013/06/25/its-show-time/

I am, naturally, restless.  It goes with the territory.  When I told friends back home the name of my blog they fell about laughing.  It was so ‘me’.  I was never a camera buff, and still am not, though I admire very much someone who can take fine photographs and understand the technical side.  

Can you think of any bloggers that you specifically admire and who helped you in your blogging journey?

Running out of superlatives | restlessjo

Jude of Travel Words is one such, and we met, in Edinburgh, several years ago.  I was amazed at how long she spent getting the shot just right.  With a background in IT, Jude had been very helpful to me with technical aspects of blogging.  Then I travelled to Seville to meet Sue Judd of Words Visual, a lady with a style all her own, and very into dereliction.  I tease her about that.  I have yet to meet with Debbie of Travel with Intent, but I’m sure we will one day.  She is an awesome photographer, currently hosting numerous challenges with ease.  Becky, who I know and love, you have already interviewed.

Yes, I loved visiting with Becky. She pretty much set me square with photos. I just found out how automatic it is in Photoshop. I’ve been trying to guesstimate for months. Now I just click a button and it’s automatically squared. YAY! I have my own technical problems, too, Jo. Tell us more about what motivated you in your blogging journey.

The people you meet and who widen your horizons are so much what the blogging world is all about, and I’m sure you’ll agree.  The walks, for me, are a window into other people’s worlds, while allowing me the freedom to ‘walk’ where I will.  The reason I have so many walks is that I’m always looking for another adventure, even if it only varies a little from previous walks.  Somewhere entirely new is the ideal, but you can always put a new slant on somewhere you’ve been.  A future challenge may well be writing a walk about somewhere I’ve never been.  I gather that virtual walks are popular now.

In a way, you are already doing that, Jo. You’re living in the future! That’s what all our posts are for others – virtual walks. Some we might want to see for ourselves, or we might have seen bits and pieces but most of the walks we will never experience. Probably the only way I will get to the region of Algarve, Portugal or the little town of Tavira, Portugal is virtually through your walks.

Jo’s Monday walk : A back street tour of Tavira | restlessjo

You said that your Monday Walks are not an official challenge. Why do you say that when so many people follow you and contribute to it?

I still don’t regard Jo’s Monday walk as a challenge.  Keeping up with the comments is a challenge! Presenting and keeping track of the walks shared can be challenging too.  I’m not an organised person and often am completing a walk late on Sunday night or early Monday morning.  I do try to assemble the walks I receive in a blank post as the week goes by.  Too easy to miss people out otherwise.  Hard to assess the time involved.  Sometimes I add links and background information, depending on the subject and if there’s history involved.  I don’t compile the walks swiftly, but read and reread my words till I’m satisfied with them, and the same with the photographs.  I mind very much how my work looks.  Too much, perhaps!  

Proofreading and editing photographs is an important lesson to learn. Do you have trouble keeping up with your walking schedule?

Still up on the roof! | restlessjo

Posting a weekly walk I find constraining, but that’s partly because I have a very enjoyable outdoors lifestyle in the Algarve.  My planning is minimal and I don’t tend to schedule walks.  I do, however, often find my head full of stuff when my head hits the pillow and words stream backwards and forwards.  I just hope that I’ve held on to the best ones when I wake up in the morning.  I’ve never properly hosted a challenge, nor do I want to.

You have never posted rules, but you definitely host an informal challenge. You are a natural hostess. I love that you also post on other people’s challenges. Has there been a time during the last ten years where you’ve needed to get away from blogging?

Still up on the roof! | restlessjo

I do try to take breaks but it’s sometimes difficult to tear yourself away from the blogging world.  I never write posts whilst away on holiday, but I will pop in on other bloggers and often answer outstanding comments.  It stops them from building up too much and I enjoy the interaction.  There is such a warm feeling when you get a great response from a reader.  It’s addictive.  I planned to step away for a while and possibly reinvent the blog last summer, but somehow Covid-19 and the need to share with and support others seemed more important.  

 COVID-19 has impacted the world, there’s no denying that. If things clear up, what are some of your goals for 2021?

A Call to place : the Azores | restlessjo

2021- most important is to be able to visit my youngsters in the UK.  Hopefully at Easter.  Beyond that I would like to spend more time exploring this country I’ve chosen to call home.  I know very little of the area beyond the Douro, in the north of Portugal.  I would love to return to the Azores– a love affair if ever there was one, but that’s for the future.

Thank you again, Restless Jo, for a delightful look into your beautiful blog and fun non-challenge. We’ve been all over Europe in this short virtual visit. Whee!

Attention Photographers

A friend of mine, Frank, is looking for photographers to collaborate with him on his website. He writes but wants to promote your photographs. It’s a great opportunity for fun and exposure. Contact him here. Collaborators – Beach Walk Reflections: Thoughts from thinking while walking (wordpress.com).  He will be host #WQWWC on February 10 – LOVE!

Announcements

  • This month our  Story Chat features author Anne Goodwin and her short story, “A Post Card from the Past.” Join in the conversation and give us your perspective. We’ve heard from writers, teachers, social workers and clinical psychologists each with their own theories. What’s your take?
  • I’m super excited that Carrot Ranch ran an interview about Story Chat in the Saddle Up Saloon.
  • Autty Jade, A Day in the Brine hosts this week’s Writer’s Quotes Wednesday Writing Challenge – Change. There’s still time to write your post and link to her blog. She’d love to visit you, and so would I. Look for a new #WQWWC topic tomorrow back on Always Write – encouraging bloggers in their endeavors worldwide.