#Sunday Stills: #Textures in Prescott, Arizona

When Terri Webster Schrandt challenged us to shoot pictures with textures for her Sunday Stills Challenge, I was inspired. Arizona is nothing but textures. Nothing is smooth and silky. So come with me, put on your helmets and gloves and let’s take off for a rough, hilly walk. Since the Lens-Artist Challenge #125 invited us to choose anything, these pictures all fit both challenges. Yay!

Part of the concept of Wabi-Sabi is being aware of our surroundings and looking for beauty in everyday life – in its impermanence and imperfection.

Tina Schell

I tried some filters on some of these shots to make them more Wabi-Sabi, but you really want to click the link and look at Tina’s pictures and read all about Wabi-Sabi then judge for yourself if I even made a dent in achieving it.

On Friday it snowed here – a beautiful dusting and all the highways if you look into the hills you can see in the shadows that the snow remains. We have shadows in Tanglewood Hills. We found textures of tufted grasses sticking out from the snowy blanket like cowlicks on the rocky soil.

We stayed on the pathway where textures abounded. I loved this tree. It reminds me of how my hands and legs feel right now. I bought some Gold Bond “healing cream” not simply hand cream. I feel sorry for this tree if it feels as itchy as I do.

Vince trotted on ahead while I stopped to admire the Wabi-Sabi display just feet from my back door. These photos were taken with our new iPhone 12 phones which we bought to replace the phones we both dropped during our month of moving. Our new phones have upscale photography tools built in. For example, they turn each still photo into a micro-video. On my phone you can see Vince take a couple of steps. Just look at all this texture! Wow!

glances down
yield an abundance
of textures
Haiku by Marsha Ingrao

Wasn’t that spectacular, and I don’t even know if it’s alive. It’s probably how the development got it’s name, Tanglewood Hills.

Depending on the type of tree, many of them are bare or nearly bare revealing layers and layers of texture. Charlotte has woven a tiny filament of texture of her own. Can you see it? Notice how blue the sky is. This leafy picture also works for Cee’s Flower of the Day Challenge.

This next picture takes you out of Tanglewood Hills and into a housing development. I took this picture because of the sharp contrast between the rock landscape and the soft fuzz of grass and the smooth concrete stairs. To heighten the contrast between textures I used a filter, it might have been poster edges. I played with all of them.

As you can see Prescott is quite hilly. Many residents have steep drives or walkways to their home. This picture is also for Cee’s FOTD Challenge. She accepts pictures of leaves.

sanded rust erodes
Hoosier stickers on windows
working man's textures
Haiku by Marsha Ingrao

Vince informed me the Hoosier meant the tires, but I still liked it because that is my home state.

This proud political sign got torn, tangled and crumpled in the textures of life. I thought it made its own political statement.

I have more pictures from today’s walk, but I’ll close with a picture of Wabi-Sabi texture that saves lives. We had more than our share of fires in California this year. If only there had been one of these every few feet in every forest.

I’m very late in the week to hook to Restless Jo’s Monday walks, but here it is a day early. We walk every day, but I don’t always shoot pictures. Thanks to all the Challenge Hosts for inspiring me to take my camera and shoot to a theme. 🙂 Have a great week.

Don’t forget to visit other challengers to encourage them on their photographic journeys.

Just follow the links!

Reminder – New Writing Challenge Starts Wednesday

A Dry October Photo Walk

#Lens Artist – Amy, takes us on a photo walk as Challenge # 117. This week, and Terri with Sunday Stills makes it a dry one. Since we live in a semi-desert area, dry pictures abound. #Tanka Tuesday sweetens the challenge because it’s poet’s choice of theme and type of poem. So here goes, I’m going to combine all of the above along with Cee’s Flower of the Day and Becky B’s October Kinda Squares

My sister-in-law and her pets live with us now. Today we took our two dogs for a mile-long walk through the Woodlake Rose Garden. I was on a quest for pictures of dry beauty like a well-aged red wine.

For once, I couldn’t take pictures to make my Kiwanis group proud. Last weekend Kiwanis recruited 37 volunteers, students and adults who spread mulch to hold in the precious moisture.

Once we got past the Kiwanis section, which could be likened to garden of sweet white wine, I didn’t have to look far.

 
Roses
Spidery
Pitied
#Haiku 2/3/2

The garden sprinkling system fails consistently but the thirsty roses get some water. No one except Chuck House brings a hose and cleans them off. I wonder what would happen if all 7,000 Woodlakers came out to work in the garden for a couple of hours this fall?

Spiders are in heaven making silky webs to trap the dust and ashes in the air. The little bug on the rose can hide out almost anywhere in the garden except where he is. Does anyone recognized him?

Roses need deadheading constantly in the summer to keep them blooming beautifully. Due to COVID, we did not have the help this summer that we usually get from the students, and the Master Gardeners were not able to come until just recently. So you will see Zombie Roses on this walk.

Deteriorated
Dilapidated, dusty
Throw-away roses
"Wait," shouted the grasshoppers.
"Look at this elegant weave
Spiders created."
#Tanka 5/7/5/7/7

The garden could be the Secret Garden before it was rediscovered. The potential of beauty is there, covered with what looks like years of neglect. In reality, it’s only a few weeks. On the cobweb blanket, you can see the ashes from the forest fires.

This rose has company that puts it to shame. The beauty of the morning glory is deceptive. It chokes out its competition, the rose and takes over if left unchecked.

Vibrant
Velvety
Contrast

Withered
Crumpled petals
Faded
#Haiku 2/3/2

Some of the plants are not as loved as the roses. My great-grandmother used to make persimmon cookies. I do not think she would be happy to see this dry tree.

Some areas of the garden have still not been adopted by organizations. In those area anything goes. In this case, the rose is surrounded, not only by thorns, but by weeds.

Lost in a weed patch
Propagating constantly
Drowning in ashes
#Haiku 5/7/5

Once in a while, you have to look up. The trees tell the long time story. Those blobs are cobwebs and debris.

After the garden walk, Cindy and Flo went home, Kalev and I drove home the back way on Sentinel Butte Road looking for more dry pictures. We weren’t disappointed. You can see the dusty, smoke-hazed, 157-AQI-sky. You can barely make out Colvin Mountain in the background.

It struck me that Woodlake is the perfect example of “the haves and have nots” when it comes to water. Wherever there is water, even just a speck, you see green life blooming. Otherwise you see brown deterioration.

Life-giving water
Sucked dry by super hot skies
Humans tricked the fruit 
Giving them a plastic teat
Yielding oranges once more.
#Tanka 5/7/5/7/7

I read this quote on Sylvia Bacon’s website,

“Beauty can be seen in all things; seeing and composing the beauty is what separates the snapshot from the photograph”

Matt Hardy

The weed and dead limbs contrasted to attract my attention.

As I drove around the corner, the hillside on the left marked the end of the dry land and the beginning of irrigated groves of orange trees.

I hope I achieved my goal of seeing and composing the beauty in this dry photo walk.

These images are inspired and submitted for the following blog challenges:

Don’t Forget to Head Over to See Kerry

https//www.kerrylizblack.wordpress.com