Over The Cliff

Central California Has Contented Cows

But we lack exotic red birds like this one. Our former neighbor is an ornithologist and spent a lifetime studying birds. I wonder if he recognizes this one? Our woodpeckers have a tiny touch of red on them, but this is my idea of a beautiful bird!

Over The Cliff

by Carol Sherritt

Close to home #4

It’s always lovely to go on a long holiday to a far-flung destination. There are times, however, when it’s not convenient or cost effective and a staycation, closer to home, is the way to go. The destinations in this series of posts are all within a couple of hours’ drive of our home. They’re easy to get to, there’s plenty to see and do and at the end of the holiday we’re home again in no time.

If dramatic mountain scenery, mild temperatures, and tranquil surroundings are on your list of holiday necessities a weekend getaway at the campground at Queen Mary Falls, 11 km east of Killarney on the Queensland/New South Wales border, is the perfect destination. The campsites and cabins are surrounded by beautiful bushland and rich pastures and the peace is broken only by bird calls and the gentle sound of contented cows.

Source: Over The Cliff

Peace and Longevity

Will We Live Longer Via Pictures?

I’ve always loved Japanese gardens. We lived near Washington Park in Portland, OR in my first apartment I shared with a roommate. They are having snow there now. I doubt if those gardens are increasing anyone’s longevity if they have to shovel snow. It might be peaceful, though.

Peace and Longevity
Japanese Garden University of Southern Queensland

You are going to have to be satisfied looking at these serene pictures. I want to experience peace and long life in person. Does it get any better than this? I’ll let you know so you can plan your trip to Australia to live longer yourself.

Peace and Longevity

by Carol Sherritt

Peace and Longevity
Japanese Garden University of Southern Queensland

October: A Garden Portrait Japanese stroll gardens are places of contemplation and harmony where visitors can wander along meandering paths through thoughtfully planned landscapes.The Japanese Garden at the University of Southern Queensland in Toowoomba is the largest stroll garden in Australia. Its traditional design includes large rocks, a tumbling waterfall and a central lake surrounded by sweeping lawns and sloping beds of Japanese and Australian native plants.

Source: Peace and Longevity

Finding new places and catching up

While I was in Australia, I saw Lake Elizabeth on a map, but here you get to see it up close through Leanne Cole’s eyes. Leanne processes her photos to make them unique. Her website describes what she does and how she takes her photos, so you can learn something to help you where ever you go to take your photos.

These posts are from her WordPress.com site. Leanne has a new site now, which is her professional site.

Finding new places and catching up

by Leanne Cole on March 13, 2016

This next week is set to be a very busy time for me. I’m doing something I’ve never done before, and there are places to go and take photos. Though first let’s start where I always do.

Book on Banyule Flats

I went out the other morning and got my final images for the book. I have done nearly all I have to now. On the morning I went out I was greeted with the most beautiful sunrise, which I took photos of. I now have the cover shot for the book and I’m really happy about that. I did take some long exposures as well.  Now I have to coordinate the book being put together and get it published.

Lake Elizabeth

We went to an amazing place up the back of Lorne called Lake Elizabeth. I have to say it was a lovely surprise. When we got to the car park I kept saying, are you sure there is a lake here, as we were in the middle of rainforest. We had to walk a bit, and do some not so nice uphill, but it was worth it. As I am sure you can see from the photos. Of course, plans are being made for a return trip. I believe camping was mentioned as well. Mmm, I’m doing some of that in a couple of weeks, will see how that goes first.  The things we do for our photography.

The photos are the walk to and from the lake and the lake. I do love how the light comes through rainforests and catches foliage. All the images were taken with the Nikon 28-300mm lens, the perfect lens for a walk like this.

Source: Finding new places and catching up

The Bush Chorus

Now That’s What I’m Talking About

The real Australia has to have a kangaroo or two. I can see Kalev in her eyes. She looks lovable, doesn’t she? But WAIT, Carol said it was noisy. What’s that next picture?

Bush Chorus Australia
Ms. Kangaroo

The Bush Chorus

by Carol Sherritt

Close to home #5

Bush Chorus
Cicada mom.

Sundown National Park, 45 kilometres south of Stanthorpe, is one of the more remote and inaccessible parks in south west Queensouth-wester leaving the New England Highway and travelling along Sundown Road, the dirt track into the park is four-wheel drive only. Driving through open forest, with glimpses of the mountain range up ahead, we feel completely isolated; midweek, the road is empty except for a lone kangaroo almost hidden in the trees.

Source: The Bush Chorus

Did You Know Some National Parks Open Every Day Except Christmas?

Montezuma Castle National Monument for One

#NaBloPoMo Cee’s Which Way Challenge, #Sedona trip#1,

Maybe it’s because the National Parks are 100 years old this year. Happy birthday, NPS.

Montezuma Castle National Monument, a thirty-minute drive in light traffic, south from Sedona, AZ surprised many tourists looking which way to go on Thanksgiving besides the dinner table.

Trail at the foot of Montezuma Castle National Monument off US Interstate 17
Trail at the foot of Montezuma Castle National Monument off US Interstate 17 in Verde Valley, AZ

Looking at the dry red rocks and desert landscape along the path at the foot of Montezuma Castle, it was hard to imagine anyone farming the area.

Darlene stops to read each informative sign along the path.
My friend Darlene stops to read each informative sign along the path.

Yet productive Hohokam and Sinagua native settlers grew corn, beans, squash and cotton from about 1125 AD to 1425 when they disappeared.

The hole in the side of the limestone cliff  was one of many openings or alcoves into which the Southern Sinagua carved  pueblos into the cliff about 10 feet. Each of these open rooms housed a small family.

Darlene and I walked the short trail admiring these open houses and chatting with visitors we met on the path with us.

Visitors from China and Porterville, CA shared the path with us on Thanksgiving morning.
Visitors from China and Porterville, CA shared the path with us on Thanksgiving morning.

These early tribes used willow trees for implements and supports in their pueblos. In spite of being built in crumbling limestone cliffs, these homes held up for 800 years.

Will ours?

For more Which Way entries, find your way to Cee Neuner’s blog. This is an easy one to enter. There’s no weekly theme. Keep a lookout for any path or road, sign, bridge, stairs. See her site for details

cees-which-way-1

Do you ever pick up and head out with old friends or family, and not know where you might end up? For the next few posts, I’ll share how my friends and I spent the week in Sedona, AZ.

Share this article if you know someone who wants to spend an hour exploring an 800-year-old settlement near Sedona, AZ.

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