COVID Vaccine, Part I

THIS IS A MUST-READ!

Hi friends, you all remember Abigail. She has received the first dose of the COVID vaccine and talks about her experience. As an active cancer patient, her doctors took additional precautions to make sure she would be okay after the vaccine, and that it would be effective. I applaud her for being so brave. It sounded like she was really between a rock and a hard place as she and her doctors made the decision to go with the vaccine.

No Half Measures

I’ve seen so many people assert quite confidently that the COVID vaccine is perfectly safe and an equal number of people quite confidently say that it is not at all safe. Who is right?

I have no idea.

Were you thinking I’d say something else? I do have a lot of opinions and I’m not usually shy at sharing them, but this is just too big for me to assert my own perspective. What I have done is follow my doctor’s advice and asked for her input every step of the way. What I have done is to weigh the risk/benefits as best I can to make the best decision possible. What I have done is considered the entire circumstances, not just myself, as I look at my choices. What I have done is consider reliable data and not anecdotal hype on both sides of the argument, as so many…

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PTSD:The impact of cyberbullying on psychological health and how to deal with online abuse

Bullying—including cyberbullying—causes significant emotional and psychological distress. Just like any other victim of bullying , cyberbullied kids …

PTSD:The impact of cyberbullying on psychological health and how to deal with online abuse

BCAM: October 31st

Thank you for sharing this month of Breast Cancer Awareness with me. I am so thrilled to have met Abigail Johnston. What a brilliant writer and advocate. I wish her and all of you a happy November, my favorite month. I celebrate my birthday November 7th with the joy of still being alive and a contributing member of society. I didn’t battle, I was lucky and had the surgeries and took the medications the doctors prescribed. But I don’t recommend getting breast cancer, so make sure you check. If something looks or feels a little off, it might be. Get it checked.

No Half Measures

It’s been quite the month, right? If you have stuck with me this whole month of facts and information about Metastatic Breast Cancer (MBC), you deserve a medal! Go ahead and pat yourself on the back for getting to the end of Breast Cancer Awareness Month (BCAM) 2020 a/k/a Pinktober a/k/a Stinktober.

And now remember that this every day, every month, every minute of our lives for those of us living with MBC. We learn daily about treatment going well, treatment going badly, someone entering hospice, someone getting diagnosed, someone dying. We wake up daily to side effucks that are chronic, like pain and nausea and explosive diarrhea. We wake up daily to reminders that our lives will never be the same. We wake up to anticipatory grief and preparation for the end of our lives.

Heavy, right?

It’s particularly appropriate to think about death on this All Hallow’s Eve…

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Breast Cancer Awareness Month: October 27

Abigail’s series is drawing to a close, but I want to thank her for educating us about terminal cancer. Many non-terminal cancer patients take drugs to limit their estrogen. I am one of them. I thought I had none left, but I was wrong. The little bit that I had promoted my cancer to grow.

Men, remember what you used to be able to blame on a woman’s hormones? Read on to find out what happens when women DON’T have hormones surging through their bodies.

BCAM: October 27th

Abigail JohnstonAdvocacyBCAM  October 27, 2020 1 Minute

Estrogen. It’s a hormone that I never really paid attention to until I was diagnosed with metastatic breast cancer (MBC). Because my subtype is hormone positive, that means my subtype is fueled by hormones. The hormones that fuel my cancer are estrogen and progesterone. So, as soon as possible after I began treatment, my doctor took steps to limit the amount of estrogen in my body. This happened with chemo, the hormone suppressing medication I took during chemo, the aromatase inhibitors I still take, and the radical hysterectomy I had in September of 2017. Radical just means they took everything out — cervix, ovaries, tubes, uterus — all the lady parts.

The result … well, estrogen is related to a lot of organs and bodily functions.

BCAM: October 26th

Do you wonder what to say to a person who is diagnosed with cancer? There are some wrong answers!!! Read Abigail’s post to learn what to say to make the person feel better not worse. 🙂

No Half Measures

Every time a person shares they have cancer, there are a variety of questions from a variety of people, family, friends and strangers alike. Some of them go along these lines … “Did you take birth control?” …. “Do you smoke?” …. “Are you overweight?” …. “How much alcohol do you drink?” … “Is there a family history?” … “Did you breastfeed?” …. “Did you get mammograms?” …. “How often did you do self-exams?” … etc.

I understand why these questions are often asked. The person asking the question is usually attempting to ensure that they don’t end up in the same position and they are trying to find the “reason” or the “culprit” for the cancer. Sometimes they want to know the answer, I suppose, but mostly it’s to put the person with cancer into a category.

The result?

The person with cancer comes to the inevitable conclusion that…

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