Sue Vincent, A Special Kind Of Blogger

You are going to hear much more about this Carrot Ranch Rodeo in the coming weeks. If you know Sue Vincent, you need to read on. If you know Geoff LePard, you need to read on to get to know him early. He is our next Story Chat guest.

TanGental

I’ve known Sue for the best part of six years, throughout my time of blogging. I’ve met her, too, at the Bloggers Bash (when I admit to a certain disappointment the red hair – see above image – wasn’t present and correct, but otherwise she was exactly who you’d assume from reading her blog). Sue is extraordinarily prolific and which generate amazing high quality content, she also finds the time to support and promote bloggers and writers like me. One of her many promotions has been her weekly #writephoto prompt which has enabled me to create a whole eclectic range of wacky and wild stories. And then she’s promoted them too.

But now Sue needs us. Tough Yorkshire lass that she is, she might baulk at that, but I don’t really care because she deserves our support.

Recently, Sue has been faced with a new and difficult challenge: lung cancer…

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The Fisherman and the Bucket

Congratulations to Doug Jacquier for this fabulous story about a teacher’s first adventures in Broome, Western Australia.

Broome, also known as Rubibi by the Yawuru people, is a coastal, pearling and tourist town in the Kimberley region of Western Australia, 1,681 km (1,045 mi) north of Perth. The urban population was 14,445 in June 2018[1] growing to over 45,000 per month during the peak tourist season (June to August).[2] https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Broome,_Western_Australia

Six Crooked Highways

As you fly in to Broome in the dry season, there is a distinct line between the red pindan desert and the violent green of the tropical vegetation and then another one between the green and the cobalt blue of the sea. It never fails to draw gasps from tourist passengers and then again as the plane descends, seeming inevitably about to clip the top of the screen of the open-air picture theatre and then bump onto the tarmac.

However, during the wet season, the contrasts are more muted and the leaden grey sky sucks the blue out of the ocean. As I descend the plane steps, my clothes instantly turn into a clingy limpness in the humidity. I recognise the principal, David Jessop, from my initial interview in Perth a few weeks ago, waving through the bars of what seems to be a tropical prison. As I wait for…

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#WQWWC #9: Trustworthiness @ColleenChesebro, @ReflectionsWalk

Welcome back to Writer’s Quotes Wednesdays Writing Challenge.

It’s simple to join in! Find quotes (as many or as few as you want), your choice of response. If you want to participate, write a post, create a pingback to link your post. Not sure how to do that? See how to create pingbacks here

Flex your creative muscles and share what you think about the topic of the week using a quote from a favorite author.

The Topic This Week

This week’s topic for #WQWWC is trustworthiness, trustworthy or trust.  

Trust seems to be in high demand and low supply in some arenas of life today. But how valuable is trustworthiness?

“The glue that holds all relationships together … is trust, and trust is based on integrity.”

Brian Tracy

Integrity means the quality or practice of being honest. 

In my mother’s preschool class a little boy took another toddler’s sunglasses and paraded around the room with them on. When Mom caught him, he cried and blamed a little girl across the room as he maintained tight possession of the sunglasses. 

Blame creates distrust.

“Our distrust is very expensive.”

Ralph Waldo Emerson

How to Build a Community with Trust

“A society that relies on generalized reciprocity is more efficient than a distrustful society, for the same reason that money is more efficient than barter. Trust lubricates social life. Networks of civic engagement also facilitate coordination and communication and amplify information about the trustworthiness of other individuals.”

Robert D. Putnam

Tulare County Office of Education(TCOE) teaches character and recognizes in children across the county for qualities like trustworthiness. Our leaders supported teachers with the program Character Counts so that students would learn the Six Pillars of Character that will make them good citizens and leaders when they grow up.

Until our department at TCOE studied The Speed of Trust by Stephen Covey, I had never associated trust with economics and speed. It made sense though when I considered how easy it is to get something done when there is trust in the relationship.

One of the reasons that moving from Woodlake was so hard for me was the economics of trust that I enjoyed because I was part of a trustworthy organization. Getting things done for Kiwanis was simple. Sometimes we signed paperwork. Sometimes the city did the paperwork for us. Sometimes we paid a fee, but most of the time it was waived. 

Kiwanis had built up trust with the city and it followed all of the members because of the years of honesty and follow through initiated by a few individuals. 

Groups that did not have that degree of trust developed, got little done and had a hard time attracting members.  

When I took an active role in Kiwanis, I felt my personal competence in trustworthiness grow. Kiwanians were known to always go the extra mile, therefore my personal level of trust with others in that community grew exponentially when I did business in their name. 

How to Grow Self-Trust

“Whoever is careless with the truth in small matters cannot be trusted in important affairs.”

Albert Einstein

My parents tried to build trustworthiness in my brother and me by assigning chores. One of my chores at age seven was emptying and burning the trash in the large oil drum in the backyard. (Showing my age here!) At least I thought burning was part of my responsibility. The trash barrel was humongous and I wasn’t, so I remember it being a difficult chore, but I loved the burning part. I remember my parents taking that chore off my list when the fire got out of hand one night. 

The trash was not the only thing that burned that night. My self-trustworthiness went down a notch as well. What I learned was that if I botched the job, I probably would not have to do that one again or possibly would face some kind of punishment for not completing the assignment successfully. 

During my school years I developed the habit of excusing myself. Forgot my homework, Mom will bring it. Don’t want to speak in front of the class – play sick. Don’t want to do an assignment – wait till the last minute. It’s no wonder that I had very little self-esteem. I wasn’t building self-trust.

One way to build self-trust and reputation for trustworthiness is through participation in church, family, job, community service organizations, sports, local theatre, or musical groups. Being part of a group holds us responsible and develops character. But developing self-trust goes deeper than keeping good company.

“The process of building trust is an interesting one, but it begins with yourself, with what I call self trust, and with your own credibility, your own trustworthiness. If you think about it, it’s hard to establish trust with others if you can’t trust yourself.

Stephen Covey

Trustworthiness is important at every level, as Stephen Covey points out. My husband and I vowed to walk 35,000 steps a week when we moved to Prescott. No one is checking up on us. This week we are not doing it because of the snow. It is going to be hard to make it up, it’s much easier to let it slide. If we want to increase our self-trust we will find a way to get those steps in or make it up later. If we do it, we will feel good about ourselves. And we will get in shape – a side benefit. 

Being trustworthy is hard work for me. I have a post that I have to get out for Wednesday, January 27th. You are going to hold me accountable because the name of the challenge has the weekday built in it. 

So what is trustworthiness to you? 

Here are some other quotes I found that I wanted to share. There are hundreds of others that may inspire you. 

“When we feel unsafe with someone and still stay with him (or her), we damage our ability to discern trustworthiness in those we will meet in the future.”

David Richo

“Women in my focus groups, they say a bald man is trustworthy. He has nothing to hide. “

Kellyanne Conway

“Your faithfulness makes you trustworthy to God.”

Edwin Louis Cole

“People crave trustworthy information about the world we live in. Some people want it because it is essential to the way they make a living. Some want it because they regard being well-informed as a condition of good citizenship. Some want it because they want something to exchange over dinner tables and water coolers.”

Bill Keller

I look forward to reading what you have to say on the subject. Talk to me! 

Check This Out

Changes by Frank

Followers Tag Along on Restless Jo’s Walks

Challenge Host Interview # 11

Good morning friends, and welcome, Restless Jo, to my blog, Always Write. I am honored to have you as a guest on my blog. I met you through my friend Carol, The Eternal Traveler, when I started blogging in 2012. When did you start blogging, Jo? 

Where did it all start?  I began, very tentatively, to blog in September 2011.  I’ve always loved to write, but technology isn’t something I took to with ease.  Ask my long suffering husband!  He’s my IT ‘expert’ but with no experience of, or interest in, the world of blogging.  I simply wanted to tell my travel stories.  Once I got the hang of blogging, I wanted to do it ‘my way’.  

Note: To find Restless Jo’s current posts enter 2021 in the search box.

https://restlessjo.me/2018/07/09/jos-monday-walk-that-bridge-and-beyond/

“Got the hang of blogging,” like this guy? Perfect picture. I’d like to be that good at blogging, but I don’t quite have the hang of it. 🙂

So how did you do it?

This usually involved mooching around in my northeast of England neck of the woods, and sharing what I found.  Although it introduced me to lots of people, I found the challenge method of blogging restrictive.  If I have something to say I value the freedom to say it, in my own way.  I guess most people who start challenges do so because they have control over the subject matter.  I struggle now to recall most of my early posts, but I know that I was always conscious of wanting my own voice.

I think I understand wanting to find your voice and doing it your own way, Jo. I wanted to write, thought I knew how to write, but I remember the days of zero to five readers. I began to question what was wrong with “my way.” I wondered what I should write about that people would want to read. I had a hard time finding my voice. It sounds like you started blogging a mind full of ideas about what to write. 

https://restlessjo.me/2018/09/10/jos-monday-walk-a-tale-of-three-castles-2-alnwick/

Yes, I did. Back in 2004 we had purchased a house in the Algarve.  Exploring that region, with the addition of my Polish family story and visits to Poland, gave me plenty of material to write about.  I had A-Z pages dedicated to the Algarve and Poland, and used them to share the culture and personal anecdotes relating to those countries.  Looking back, the blog was ‘bitty’ and I felt I needed a direction.  

So how did you arrive at the name of Restless Jo and the Monday Walks?

https://restlessjo.me/2017/03/06/jos-monday-walk-ponte-vecchio/

Wherever I went, I always walked.  I don’t drive, and it was my style of exploring.  And blogging about the walks became a good way to share almost anything.  So, in March 2014, Jo’s Monday Walk was born.  The posts were far from being ‘start here at point A and continue till you reach point B 2 hours later’.  They were just me, doing what I do best- walking and talking.  

I love that – both walking and talking, kind of like this interview. 

What’s Up, Doc? | restlessjo

 

I found it came very naturally, and people seemed to respond easily to that.  Depending on the subject, I usually included rough whereabouts and direction, but seldom with the thought of anyone walking in my footsteps.  It was my bit of escapism, and was thrown open to the public as just that.  Anyone could contribute what they thought of as a walk.  Sometimes it might only be a couple of photos and a thought or two.  Other times it went into great detail.  I didn’t mind.  It was just fun, and it gave me a way to post whatever or wherever I wanted.

How did you come up with the name of Restless Jo?

https://restlessjo.wordpress.com/2013/06/25/its-show-time/

I am, naturally, restless.  It goes with the territory.  When I told friends back home the name of my blog they fell about laughing.  It was so ‘me’.  I was never a camera buff, and still am not, though I admire very much someone who can take fine photographs and understand the technical side.  

Can you think of any bloggers that you specifically admire and who helped you in your blogging journey?

Running out of superlatives | restlessjo

Jude of Travel Words is one such, and we met, in Edinburgh, several years ago.  I was amazed at how long she spent getting the shot just right.  With a background in IT, Jude had been very helpful to me with technical aspects of blogging.  Then I travelled to Seville to meet Sue Judd of Words Visual, a lady with a style all her own, and very into dereliction.  I tease her about that.  I have yet to meet with Debbie of Travel with Intent, but I’m sure we will one day.  She is an awesome photographer, currently hosting numerous challenges with ease.  Becky, who I know and love, you have already interviewed.

Yes, I loved visiting with Becky. She pretty much set me square with photos. I just found out how automatic it is in Photoshop. I’ve been trying to guesstimate for months. Now I just click a button and it’s automatically squared. YAY! I have my own technical problems, too, Jo. Tell us more about what motivated you in your blogging journey.

The people you meet and who widen your horizons are so much what the blogging world is all about, and I’m sure you’ll agree.  The walks, for me, are a window into other people’s worlds, while allowing me the freedom to ‘walk’ where I will.  The reason I have so many walks is that I’m always looking for another adventure, even if it only varies a little from previous walks.  Somewhere entirely new is the ideal, but you can always put a new slant on somewhere you’ve been.  A future challenge may well be writing a walk about somewhere I’ve never been.  I gather that virtual walks are popular now.

In a way, you are already doing that, Jo. You’re living in the future! That’s what all our posts are for others – virtual walks. Some we might want to see for ourselves, or we might have seen bits and pieces but most of the walks we will never experience. Probably the only way I will get to the region of Algarve, Portugal or the little town of Tavira, Portugal is virtually through your walks.

Jo’s Monday walk : A back street tour of Tavira | restlessjo

You said that your Monday Walks are not an official challenge. Why do you say that when so many people follow you and contribute to it?

I still don’t regard Jo’s Monday walk as a challenge.  Keeping up with the comments is a challenge! Presenting and keeping track of the walks shared can be challenging too.  I’m not an organised person and often am completing a walk late on Sunday night or early Monday morning.  I do try to assemble the walks I receive in a blank post as the week goes by.  Too easy to miss people out otherwise.  Hard to assess the time involved.  Sometimes I add links and background information, depending on the subject and if there’s history involved.  I don’t compile the walks swiftly, but read and reread my words till I’m satisfied with them, and the same with the photographs.  I mind very much how my work looks.  Too much, perhaps!  

Proofreading and editing photographs is an important lesson to learn. Do you have trouble keeping up with your walking schedule?

Still up on the roof! | restlessjo

Posting a weekly walk I find constraining, but that’s partly because I have a very enjoyable outdoors lifestyle in the Algarve.  My planning is minimal and I don’t tend to schedule walks.  I do, however, often find my head full of stuff when my head hits the pillow and words stream backwards and forwards.  I just hope that I’ve held on to the best ones when I wake up in the morning.  I’ve never properly hosted a challenge, nor do I want to.

You have never posted rules, but you definitely host an informal challenge. You are a natural hostess. I love that you also post on other people’s challenges. Has there been a time during the last ten years where you’ve needed to get away from blogging?

Still up on the roof! | restlessjo

I do try to take breaks but it’s sometimes difficult to tear yourself away from the blogging world.  I never write posts whilst away on holiday, but I will pop in on other bloggers and often answer outstanding comments.  It stops them from building up too much and I enjoy the interaction.  There is such a warm feeling when you get a great response from a reader.  It’s addictive.  I planned to step away for a while and possibly reinvent the blog last summer, but somehow Covid-19 and the need to share with and support others seemed more important.  

 COVID-19 has impacted the world, there’s no denying that. If things clear up, what are some of your goals for 2021?

A Call to place : the Azores | restlessjo

2021- most important is to be able to visit my youngsters in the UK.  Hopefully at Easter.  Beyond that I would like to spend more time exploring this country I’ve chosen to call home.  I know very little of the area beyond the Douro, in the north of Portugal.  I would love to return to the Azores– a love affair if ever there was one, but that’s for the future.

Thank you again, Restless Jo, for a delightful look into your beautiful blog and fun non-challenge. We’ve been all over Europe in this short virtual visit. Whee!

Attention Photographers

A friend of mine, Frank, is looking for photographers to collaborate with him on his website. He writes but wants to promote your photographs. It’s a great opportunity for fun and exposure. Contact him here. Collaborators – Beach Walk Reflections: Thoughts from thinking while walking (wordpress.com).  He will be host #WQWWC on February 10 – LOVE!

Announcements

  • This month our  Story Chat features author Anne Goodwin and her short story, “A Post Card from the Past.” Join in the conversation and give us your perspective. We’ve heard from writers, teachers, social workers and clinical psychologists each with their own theories. What’s your take?
  • I’m super excited that Carrot Ranch ran an interview about Story Chat in the Saddle Up Saloon.
  • Autty Jade, A Day in the Brine hosts this week’s Writer’s Quotes Wednesday Writing Challenge – Change. There’s still time to write your post and link to her blog. She’d love to visit you, and so would I. Look for a new #WQWWC topic tomorrow back on Always Write – encouraging bloggers in their endeavors worldwide.

How to #Square Up and Clear Up Sunday’s Still’s Preoccupation with Fog and Clouds

Heads Up

These bloggers are incorruptible, so I’m going to face their preoocupations head on and give them something to chat up. I’m happy #Hobbyblogging!

First the Fog

Today is mine. Tomorrow is none of my business. If I peer anxiously into the fog of the future I will strain my spiritual eyes so that I will not see clearly what is required of me now!

 Elisabeth Elliot

Searching through my archives sent me back to December 11, 2012 a few minutes after 8:00 am to find these extreme foggy day photos. Sometimes you have to pull off the road and enjoy the scenery. In this case there wasn’t any, so I enjoyed that, too.

All of these photos fit into Terri’s Sunday Stills theme and they are all squared up, so Becky B will have to bat her eyes to try to clear them up. Warning: There is nothing wrong with your eye sight.

I think this shot also applies to Cee’s CBWC – Vanishing Point, too except that you have to imagine that the point vanishes somewhere out there in the wild gray yonder. I can sort of see it. Can you?

All the rest of the foggy day pictures are from the same day. I liked these pictures because in the fog the cultivated field looked like a very choppy sea or river to me. I walked on the “water” to get a better picture. It crunched beneath my feet. If only someone had been with me to capture the moment. What a loss!

As the sun started to break through the fog, you could begin to see the peaks of the Sierra Nevada. There’s Sawtooth!

Of course you see it, don’t you?

It wasn’t long, as I waited, and the sun came out a little more leaving streaks of fog like layers of sandstone. The ground lost it’s choppy water look. Nobody would have believed me anyway.

You never realized how thick your fog was until it lifted.

 J.R. Ward

Now the Clouds

“Ever changing clouds paint portraits on the sky, and each person sees a different image.”

 Rhonda Savage Thompson

In the mile-high city of Prescott, AZ, we live in the clouds rather than under them. They are not painting a picture today as they do in other seasons. They are full of snow. Especially today. The Weather Bureau calls it a “Winter Weather Alert!” I call it a blizzard. Listen to the euphonious video Vince just took of the wind. Imagine flying in these clouds!

Just two of us
In the blizzard
Blanketed with cold
Giant clumps of snow 
blown off hairy pine limbs
Drop in the path of no return.
Stay inside!

Marsha Ingrao

I chose this picture for CBWC. Again the vanishing point is imaginary. The horizontal one cut off by the building, and the vertical one cut off by the square up. The sidewalk that was cleared three hours ago now is covered with about four to six inches deep.

I put on Vince’s boots and stomped out about five steps to look down the vanishing point. Wow. These clouds have been super busy.

“Clouds come floating into my life, no longer to carry rain or usher storm, but to add color to my sunset sky.”

Rabindranath Tagore, Stray Birds

This is all exciting the second time out this year. Vince and I feel like kids again. This morning we were living in the clouds. This afternoon, the clouds tried to blast a hole into our home. It clogged up the satellite dish and iced up my window so I can no longer see the snow as it falls.

As soon as the snow clears, I’m getting my own boots. I ordered electric socks to wear under them yesterday after talking to a young neighbor. Then I can take you on a walk the next time it snows.

Attention Photographers

A hobby blogging friend of mine, Frank, is looking for photographers to collaborate with him on his website. He writes but wants to promote your photographs. It’s a great opportunity for fun and exposure. Contact him here. Collaborators – Beach Walk Reflections: Thoughts from thinking while walking (wordpress.com).  He will be host #WQWWC on February 10 – LOVE!

Announcements

  • This month our  Story Chat features author Anne Goodwin and her short story, “A Post Card from the Past.” Join in the conversation and give us your perspective. We’ve heard from writers, teachers, social workers and clinical psychologists each with their own theories. What’s your take?
  • I’m super excited that Carrot Ranch ran an interview about Story Chat in the Saddle Up Saloon.
  • Autty Jade, A Day in the Brine hosts this week’s Writer’s Quotes Wednesday Writing Challenge – Change. There’s still time to write your post and link to her blog. She’d love to visit you and so would I.
  • Welcome Restless Jo as the newest Featured Blogger on the Challenge Host Interview Series coming up tomorrow.
  • Wednesday the #WQWWC is back at Always Write. Looking for quotes and responses about trustworthiness.

See you on some of your favorite challenges. What are your favorite challenges?