BCAM; October 5th

Not to scare you, but NO ONE is too young to get Breast Cancer. More research is needed for those whose breast cancer has turned into Stage IV Metastatic Breast Cancer since most of the women are under 40 and have families, jobs in the midst of a busy life with multiple responsibilities. How can you help? Reblog these posts from Abigail Johnston.

No Half Measures

The median age of diagnosis with breast cancer in the US is 61 and anyone who has seen a parade or group of women with breast cancer will note that the age trends towards the post-menopausal. However, the a growing segment is those of us diagnosed with breast cancer pre-menopausal. Many of us were told: β€œYou are too young for breast cancer,” during the process of diagnosis, which was entirely wrong.

Like Adiba, I was pre-menopausal when I was diagnosed with MBC at 38 while I was still tandem breastfeeding my boys, then 1 and 3. My boys are now 5 and 7. Neither of them remember much about the time before breast cancer became a central part of our lives.

Those of us who are diagnosed pre-menopausal, perhaps pre-children, have needs that are very very different from those who are post-menopausal. We are in a different phase of life…

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Author: Marsha

Hi, I'm Marsha Ingrao, author, blogger and retired teacher/consultant - Promoting Hobby Blogging

13 thoughts on “BCAM; October 5th”

      1. I know. My sister died from it at age 36. My mum had it when she was 81 and survived until she was 90. Another sister got it when she was 69 and has not long finished treatment. I wonder when it will be my turn. I don’t worry about it but do the checks and make sure I enjoy each day. My sister’s early passing taught me the importance of that.

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        1. Wow, Norah. That is way too close to home. We didn’t have any BC in our family, but plenty of other kinds. In a way that made it easier when they told me I had it. I expected to get cancer of some type if I lived long enough. I am glad you are very careful. I had dense tissue for a couple of mammograms, then I had a little indentation that hadn’t been there before. I thought it might just be fat, but I mentioned it, and they checked it out. The weirdest thing that alerted me that I might have cancer, was a faint scent on my side of the bed that smelled like my Dad when he had cancer. It was like a premonition kind of thing so it did not come as a big shock. I hope you follow in your mom’s footsteps and live to be 90+.

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          1. That’s fascinating about the scent, Marsha. I hope you are remaining well after your treatment. May we both be blogging conversations well into our 90s. Having said that, blogging probably won’t exist then. We’ll be transmitting telepathically. πŸ™‚

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