Iconic America: Bob’s Old Barn

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Who doesn’t love old barns? It’s un-American to hate barns, the image of rural life that once predominated in this country. Today the golden hour arrived with dark gray ominous clouds in the east and brilliant sunlight in the west blasting the spotlight on all the wildflowers in bloom on the foothills. I told Vince I wanted him to take me to the barn we had both decided would make a great photo shoot. I hope you agree with me.

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He decided to drop me off, and let me walk home, so I took my time.

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The weeds turned out to be nearly as interesting as the barn. They don’t look that high from the road, but in places they could do some intimidating. That black thing  holding out gigantic arms is me to give you some perspective on the height of this particularly lovely weed. I am five feet five inches tall.

I tried to take a selfie of me and the weed to show you how tall it was.
I took a selfie with this weed to show you how tall it was.

Along the way I found some items of interest. From the highway this field looks uninhabited, but wait till you see what I found. My favorite might be the road hugger.

 

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The road has gotten a bit overgrown, but the road hugger hugs on. But I also love the old trough.

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I don’t know what that bulb is, but it added to the excitement of finding the trough buried in the greenery. However, this find can’t compare to the underground house I found just lying around next door to the barn looking like a well-read book lying on a nightstand.

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I’m not sure what this blue container held, but I didn’t look for a spigot. I think it might have landed here from outer space. Bob used to launch rockets not too far from here. Maybe one returned with a present.

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The weeds amazed me. If they’d been in the mountains I could call them wildflowers, but here on the valley floor, I know better.

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They made a great  frame for my Bob’s barn.

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I finally quit dallying and did what I came for. It actually still smelled like a barn inside.

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Someone must have slept here a while back, and left their bed unmade.

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I’m sure this bed belonged to a boy. It seriously looked like the kinds of things my brother hid under his bed, when he was a kid, except the old Halloween candy was missing here. Maybe I didn’t look hard enough.  What do you mean you can’t tell it’s a bed?

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It would spring up and strike you if it were a snake coiled up like this. Klutzy me, I had to bounce on it a bit. (holding my camera securely against me, of course)

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The guy must have gotten mad one night and threw the head off to the other side of the room. Maybe he just had a bad dream and lost his head. Either way this sissy road hugger that came in out of the weather ended up with a bed head on it, so it’s stuck there now.

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Enough with the stuff. You came here to see a barn.

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This barn has an open door policy.

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The view out the back is wild. (flowers that is)

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It’s got good bones, and lots of them.

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The open floor plan is ever popular.

 

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Good views from every door window  opening.

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It’s built with long-lasting, high-quality parts.

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Upon close inspection, I didn’t find any evidence of termite damage.

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But if someone from Central California ever advertises foothill acreage, filled with wildflowers, with a top-notch barn, you might want to take a look first before you buy.

2015 Hengst Barn205Thank you Bob for letting me take pictures of your barn. I loved it. 🙂 I hope my blogger friends did, too.

 

Author: Marsha

Hi, I'm Marsha Ingrao, author, blogger and retired teacher/consultant. Read more about me here. http://wp.me/P7tP3I-2

33 thoughts on “Iconic America: Bob’s Old Barn”

  1. Yup! I enjoyed your meander in the undergrowth to show us this bar.

    That “bulb” in the trough would be a float to turn off the water when it reached a certain height, rather like the old fashioned toilet cisterns.

    Liked by 3 people

    1. Isn’t that the amazing thing? Countrysides are often the most littered. I remember rural Indiana when I was a kid, and seeing old cars or washing machines. I never thought that was cool then, but somehow I like rust now. hmmm

      Liked by 1 person

  2. Wonderful photos, both of the barn and the surrounding countryside. I love the close ups of wood and metal. You can almost feel the grittiness.

    I love old barns, too. We had one at our family farm up at Davis until it blew down about 10 years ago. It was at least 100 years old. Broke my heart when I heard it had collapsed. I seems like there’s a big gaping hole where it used to be whenever I visit now.

    Liked by 1 person

  3. As realtors love to say, “Location, location, location.” The barn has the best views, and I love the open plan. They do say that walls have ears, but if only they had a voice too. I’d love to know the history of this old ramshackle place. Just imagine how many kids you could bathe in that old trough! I’m sure that it was so beautiful once upon a time.Your photos made me sort of sad, Marsha, but I’m glad you found this forsaken, rundown barn and gave it an airing here. 🙂

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  4. I would buy it in a second. Superb shots. The photo with the framing of flowers is spectacular. Your commentary was too funny. A wonderful adventure thanks to Bob. Best wishes,

    smiling toad

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      1. That is sad. I know how you feel. For the last 10 years we have lived in an area of beautiful bushland, with kangaroos, parrots and lots of other wildlife. We even saw an echidna once. This week it has all been bulldozed by developers…that’s it, gone forever. We are feeling quite devastated by the loss.

        Liked by 1 person

        1. Wow, that is a loss. What happened to all the wildlife? Did they have anywhere to go? Here they protect the wildlife somewhat. If they find evidence of an endangered species, they can’t build. Of course, that’s after they killed the last grizzly bear. 😦

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