The Ubiquitous Abizia

ABIZIA JULIBRISSIN are beautiful, but DON’T plant these trees in your back yard unless you have at least an acre!  We tried it once in a little PUD that had a back yard about 75 X 25 square feet.  Trust me on this one!

These beastly beauties try to bamboozle you into buying them  by disguising their true identity with other aliases. Sneaky nurseries may label them as acacias, or mimosas, and sometimes they go by an alternative spelling  of albizia to throw you off.  So go into the nursery ready with this information.  Don’t be fooled by their delicate flowers and ferny-locust like leaves.  When those dainty dazzlers get tired of shimmering in the sun, they drop.

While the little fuzzies are ubiquitous, they do disintegrate and decompose over time.  That works great in bark, not bad in grass, ok in your rock driveway, not so great on your patio.  So they are not the real problem unless you are a neat freak

The real issue is this little green innocuous looking mini-abizia.  Don’t be fooled by its youthful innocence.

They are easy to dislodge at this point, but dislodge you must!

You might even consider employing a beast of burden to help you carry them out of the area.  Mama Kitty is a willing transporter.  If you don’t do this, you could end up with an abizia forest.

Mini-abizias are little chameleons.  There are three self-seeding pink cosmos.  Take a wild guess about how many camouflaged abizia seedlings are nestled  around these frothy flowers.

Count them – there are 57 wanna-be abizia trees in this pile of thwarted mimosas.  So you might think, “Big deal,”  They can’t all grow, and it takes years for a tree to become big enough to be a problem.”  THINK AGAIN.

The fruitless mulberry tree is probably at least 40 years old.  The abizia on the right is about nine yeas old.  That was our original abizia tree.

This tree is a combination of two seedlings that sprouted probably 200 feet away from our original tree five years ago.   They’re in a good place, and the car doesn’t mind a little littering.  So they got to stay.  My husband even put a little stake to hold them up and remind me that I wasn’t to dislodge them.

This angle gives you another perspective on the size of this kindergarten-aged tree.

These spell-binding pretties are two or three baby abizias wrapping their trunks around each other begging us not to uproot them.  They are mere pre-schoolers – about three summers old.  Think witches’ spell, and save yourself before it’s too late!

The culprits are these seed pods.  They break open, and poof they are in the neighbor’s yard.  So if you don’t want your neighbors to think you are making shady deals, DON’T plant abizias close to the property line.

Author: Marsha

Hi, I'm Marsha Ingrao, author, blogger and retired teacher/consultant. Read more about me here. http://wp.me/P7tP3I-2

4 thoughts on “The Ubiquitous Abizia”

  1. I’ve always thought that they were in the category of look but don’t plant. Thank you for the confirmation!

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